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The Pragmatics of Prophet-Praise Formulas in Jordan

The Pragmatics of Prophet-Praise Formulas in Jordan Abstract: This article explores the pragmatics of prototypically religious prophet-praise formulas as used in everyday interactional settings in Jordan. Analysis of naturally occurring data shows that formulas of this type serve various pragmatic functions—place-holding during hesitations, seeking protection from envy, marking success, and intensifying the basic message of the utterance. Imperative and interrogative versions are used to terminate a disruptive activity or to elicit involvement and agreement, and as a device for claiming the floor. The pragmatic deployment of these formulas shows the intertwining of language, culture, and religion in communicating meaning in Arabic. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropological Linguistics University of Nebraska Press

The Pragmatics of Prophet-Praise Formulas in Jordan

Anthropological Linguistics , Volume 55 (1) – Dec 8, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6527
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: This article explores the pragmatics of prototypically religious prophet-praise formulas as used in everyday interactional settings in Jordan. Analysis of naturally occurring data shows that formulas of this type serve various pragmatic functions—place-holding during hesitations, seeking protection from envy, marking success, and intensifying the basic message of the utterance. Imperative and interrogative versions are used to terminate a disruptive activity or to elicit involvement and agreement, and as a device for claiming the floor. The pragmatic deployment of these formulas shows the intertwining of language, culture, and religion in communicating meaning in Arabic.

Journal

Anthropological LinguisticsUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 8, 2013

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