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The Politics of Parenting in Nancy Huston's Fault Lines: Transgenerational Trauma Revisited

The Politics of Parenting in Nancy Huston's Fault Lines: Transgenerational Trauma Revisited The Politics of Parenting in Nancy Huston’s Fault Lines Transgenerational Trauma Revisited Susan Bainbrigge Writing in the Financial Times about French author Alexandre Jardin’s book Des gens très bien, a controversial revisiting of his wartime family history and grandfather’s collaborationist past, journalist Simon Kuper concluded his review with the statement: “One day the war might cease to be a family trauma, but that is still decades away.” Henry Rousso’s 1987 study of the “syndrome de Vichy” underlines this view: the traumatic legacy of the Occupation in France, ever- present in the French psyche as “un passé qui ne passe pas.” Th e legacies of World War II continue to inform writings by contemporary authors and to be of interest to readers and critics, as evidenced by the many literary prizes and high volume sales of such publications. Nancy Huston is no exception: writing in her native English and adop- tive French, she has drawn on her own experiences of displacement and loss to revisit the legacies of war and familial trauma in novels such as Th e Mark of the Angel (L’Empreinte de l’ange, 1998) and the focus here, Fault Lines. First published in French as Lignes de faille http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Literature and Trauma Studies University of Nebraska Press

The Politics of Parenting in Nancy Huston's Fault Lines: Transgenerational Trauma Revisited

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2045-4740

Abstract

The Politics of Parenting in Nancy Huston’s Fault Lines Transgenerational Trauma Revisited Susan Bainbrigge Writing in the Financial Times about French author Alexandre Jardin’s book Des gens très bien, a controversial revisiting of his wartime family history and grandfather’s collaborationist past, journalist Simon Kuper concluded his review with the statement: “One day the war might cease to be a family trauma, but that is still decades away.” Henry Rousso’s 1987 study of the “syndrome de Vichy” underlines this view: the traumatic legacy of the Occupation in France, ever- present in the French psyche as “un passé qui ne passe pas.” Th e legacies of World War II continue to inform writings by contemporary authors and to be of interest to readers and critics, as evidenced by the many literary prizes and high volume sales of such publications. Nancy Huston is no exception: writing in her native English and adop- tive French, she has drawn on her own experiences of displacement and loss to revisit the legacies of war and familial trauma in novels such as Th e Mark of the Angel (L’Empreinte de l’ange, 1998) and the focus here, Fault Lines. First published in French as Lignes de faille

Journal

Journal of Literature and Trauma StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 8, 2020

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