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The Noir Atlantic: Chester Himes and the Birth of the Francophone African Crime Novel by Pim Higginson (review)

The Noir Atlantic: Chester Himes and the Birth of the Francophone African Crime Novel by Pim... Book Reviews But it does shape our understanding of Zola's late work in particular, which continues to demand more analysis. Moreover, Febles's introduction hints at a wider set of implications: the link between anarchism and art in Third Republic France. More work has been done on anarchy in the symbolist and modernist aesthetic, while ignoring its connection to realist and naturalist works that express the everyday of Third Republic France. Scholarship has tended to emphasize the tension between the spatio-temporal and narratological orderliness of the naturalist project, and not without reason, but it has left little room for the troubling unpredictability of the anarchist or other revolutionary politics. One of the book's goals is to make headway for an "integrated theory of anarchy and literature" (20) that discards the assumption that entropy reveals realism and anarchism to be mutually incompatible (27). For Zola's novels at least, Febles provides a useful corrective to that assumption (in Uri Eizensweig's Fictions de l'anarchisme, for example) by inviting us to rethink the relation between realism and anarchism, on both historical and aesthetic grounds. As a final note, Febles's work is solidly grounded in an understanding of by now well established thinking on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

The Noir Atlantic: Chester Himes and the Birth of the Francophone African Crime Novel by Pim Higginson (review)

French Forum , Volume 39 (2) – Jan 9, 2014

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836
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Abstract

Book Reviews But it does shape our understanding of Zola's late work in particular, which continues to demand more analysis. Moreover, Febles's introduction hints at a wider set of implications: the link between anarchism and art in Third Republic France. More work has been done on anarchy in the symbolist and modernist aesthetic, while ignoring its connection to realist and naturalist works that express the everyday of Third Republic France. Scholarship has tended to emphasize the tension between the spatio-temporal and narratological orderliness of the naturalist project, and not without reason, but it has left little room for the troubling unpredictability of the anarchist or other revolutionary politics. One of the book's goals is to make headway for an "integrated theory of anarchy and literature" (20) that discards the assumption that entropy reveals realism and anarchism to be mutually incompatible (27). For Zola's novels at least, Febles provides a useful corrective to that assumption (in Uri Eizensweig's Fictions de l'anarchisme, for example) by inviting us to rethink the relation between realism and anarchism, on both historical and aesthetic grounds. As a final note, Febles's work is solidly grounded in an understanding of by now well established thinking on

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 9, 2014

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