The New Woman

The New Woman The New Woman By Barbara E. Pope Waverley Magazine, 18 July 1896 argaret Hartwell was beautiful. Everybody admitted that. She was intelligent, industrious and amiable. Her husband loved her and was proud of her; but he found, rather to his dismay, that the little peculiarities which had amused him in the days of his short courtship, and which had occasionally called forth a hearty laugh while on the wedding tour, were not mere girlish whims and fancies. They were the straws which indicate the true direction of the wind. Margaret was refined and gentle. She had virtues enough for two or three women; but she was a daughter of Wyoming, and Frank Hartwell was forced to acknowledge that his lovely wife had deeply imbibed the social and political heresy of her native State. She not only believed in the emancipation of women, but she had evidently been accustomed to a full measure of freedom, which she intended still to enjoy. It was not Frank Hartwell's desire to become the lord and master of his wife; but he did expect her to lean on him somewhat. Woman in his opinion was a very high order of being; but she http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers University of Nebraska Press

The New Woman

Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, Volume 32 (2) – Dec 18, 2015

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-0643
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The New Woman By Barbara E. Pope Waverley Magazine, 18 July 1896 argaret Hartwell was beautiful. Everybody admitted that. She was intelligent, industrious and amiable. Her husband loved her and was proud of her; but he found, rather to his dismay, that the little peculiarities which had amused him in the days of his short courtship, and which had occasionally called forth a hearty laugh while on the wedding tour, were not mere girlish whims and fancies. They were the straws which indicate the true direction of the wind. Margaret was refined and gentle. She had virtues enough for two or three women; but she was a daughter of Wyoming, and Frank Hartwell was forced to acknowledge that his lovely wife had deeply imbibed the social and political heresy of her native State. She not only believed in the emancipation of women, but she had evidently been accustomed to a full measure of freedom, which she intended still to enjoy. It was not Frank Hartwell's desire to become the lord and master of his wife; but he did expect her to lean on him somewhat. Woman in his opinion was a very high order of being; but she

Journal

Legacy: A Journal of American Women WritersUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 18, 2015

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