Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The New "Queer" and the Old Racism

The New "Queer" and the Old Racism Elías Krell “Trans” or transgender topics have exploded in the last ten to fi ft een years, as even those scholars of music who actively avoid culturally critical work would be hard- pressed to ignore. Susan Stryker and Stephen Whittle’s Transgender Studies Reader launched a fi eld in which “trans” was theorized as an identity, positionality, and an- alytic. Unsettling aspects of embodiment, identity, and politics that even “queer” could not account for, “trans” became the new queer, in a sense. The tectonic plate- shift ing idea that morphology and gender are not coterminous fundamentally cha(lle)nged queer and feminist scholarship, a challenge that was both produced by and productive of a certain “radicality” that was then attributed to “trans” as a modifi er. In this discussion, I suggest that the implicit radicality of terms like “queer” and “trans” produces the very elision of race, class, ability, and other vectors of power that those terms presumably meant to include. Radical modifi ers oft en reproduce the very structural elisions they are supposed to critique. The fi rst section of my argument examines the performative eff ect of a term that is taken to be transgressive. The second section traces several http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture University of Nebraska Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/the-new-queer-and-the-old-racism-TGEncusS5P
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612

Abstract

Elías Krell “Trans” or transgender topics have exploded in the last ten to fi ft een years, as even those scholars of music who actively avoid culturally critical work would be hard- pressed to ignore. Susan Stryker and Stephen Whittle’s Transgender Studies Reader launched a fi eld in which “trans” was theorized as an identity, positionality, and an- alytic. Unsettling aspects of embodiment, identity, and politics that even “queer” could not account for, “trans” became the new queer, in a sense. The tectonic plate- shift ing idea that morphology and gender are not coterminous fundamentally cha(lle)nged queer and feminist scholarship, a challenge that was both produced by and productive of a certain “radicality” that was then attributed to “trans” as a modifi er. In this discussion, I suggest that the implicit radicality of terms like “queer” and “trans” produces the very elision of race, class, ability, and other vectors of power that those terms presumably meant to include. Radical modifi ers oft en reproduce the very structural elisions they are supposed to critique. The fi rst section of my argument examines the performative eff ect of a term that is taken to be transgressive. The second section traces several

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 17, 2018

There are no references for this article.