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The Necessity of Lived Resistance: Reading Leslie Marmon Silko's Gardens in the Dunes in an Era of Rapid Climate Change

The Necessity of Lived Resistance: Reading Leslie Marmon Silko's Gardens in the Dunes in an... Th e Necessity of Lived Resistance Reading Leslie Marmon Silko’s Gardens in the Dunes in an Era of Rapid Climate Change Rebecca Tillett In its complex readings of a range of fi ctional gardens, gardeners, and gardening practices, Leslie Marmon Silko’s 1999 novel Gardens in the Dunes engages with and foregrounds Indigenous relationships with the Earth as powerful alternatives to the unsustainable and damaging ways that many Euro- American and European societies live today. Set at the close of the nineteenth century, Gardens focuses primarily on a single, all- female Indigenous Sand Lizard family, the only group still using the traditional dune gardens. Told from the perspective of the young Sand Lizard child Indigo, the story follows Indigo and her older sibling, Sister Salt, once they are captured by Indian agents aft er their mother goes missing at a Ghost Dance in Needles, Arizona, and their grandmother, Grandma Fleet, dies and is buried by her granddaughters at the old dune gardens. Declared orphans by the state, the sisters are separated with Sister Salt sent to the Parker Reservation on the Colorado River while Indigo is sent to Indian boarding school in California. Th e story then follows two separate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

The Necessity of Lived Resistance: Reading Leslie Marmon Silko's Gardens in the Dunes in an Era of Rapid Climate Change

Studies in American Indian Literatures , Volume 32 (1) – Sep 11, 2020

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1548-9590

Abstract

Th e Necessity of Lived Resistance Reading Leslie Marmon Silko’s Gardens in the Dunes in an Era of Rapid Climate Change Rebecca Tillett In its complex readings of a range of fi ctional gardens, gardeners, and gardening practices, Leslie Marmon Silko’s 1999 novel Gardens in the Dunes engages with and foregrounds Indigenous relationships with the Earth as powerful alternatives to the unsustainable and damaging ways that many Euro- American and European societies live today. Set at the close of the nineteenth century, Gardens focuses primarily on a single, all- female Indigenous Sand Lizard family, the only group still using the traditional dune gardens. Told from the perspective of the young Sand Lizard child Indigo, the story follows Indigo and her older sibling, Sister Salt, once they are captured by Indian agents aft er their mother goes missing at a Ghost Dance in Needles, Arizona, and their grandmother, Grandma Fleet, dies and is buried by her granddaughters at the old dune gardens. Declared orphans by the state, the sisters are separated with Sister Salt sent to the Parker Reservation on the Colorado River while Indigo is sent to Indian boarding school in California. Th e story then follows two separate

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Sep 11, 2020

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