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The Land Has Memory: Indigenous Knowledge, Native Landscapes, and the National Museum of the American Indian (review)

The Land Has Memory: Indigenous Knowledge, Native Landscapes, and the National Museum of the... in which these neotraditional ceremonies surrounding repatriation offer some closure to the act of return. There is a clear bent to this book; however, this is not unwelcome. Aside from the contribution by C. Loring Brace, who makes the case for scientific study of the remains, the rest is a compilation of essays written by those who would like to see the Ancient One repatriated to the claimant tribes and reburied without further desecration. Having said that, the juxtaposition of published images of Kennewick Man or the Ancient One seem curious and contradictory, due to those who would find this to be tantamount to a sacrilegious and offensive act, bordering on a form of visual desecration in and of itself. Some of the pieces from tribal leaders feel dated, as they are drawn from opinion papers published at the time of the case. Perhaps more attention could have been paid to how the Ancient One figures now, more than ten years on, into the overall larger picture of repatriation and NAGPRA. Beyond that, points of contention with or complaints about this collection of pieces are few. The importance of the fact that repatriation is continuing along, progressing from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

The Land Has Memory: Indigenous Knowledge, Native Landscapes, and the National Museum of the American Indian (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 34 (3) – Jul 29, 2010

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

in which these neotraditional ceremonies surrounding repatriation offer some closure to the act of return. There is a clear bent to this book; however, this is not unwelcome. Aside from the contribution by C. Loring Brace, who makes the case for scientific study of the remains, the rest is a compilation of essays written by those who would like to see the Ancient One repatriated to the claimant tribes and reburied without further desecration. Having said that, the juxtaposition of published images of Kennewick Man or the Ancient One seem curious and contradictory, due to those who would find this to be tantamount to a sacrilegious and offensive act, bordering on a form of visual desecration in and of itself. Some of the pieces from tribal leaders feel dated, as they are drawn from opinion papers published at the time of the case. Perhaps more attention could have been paid to how the Ancient One figures now, more than ten years on, into the overall larger picture of repatriation and NAGPRA. Beyond that, points of contention with or complaints about this collection of pieces are few. The importance of the fact that repatriation is continuing along, progressing from

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jul 29, 2010

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