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The Indigenous Researcher as Individual and Collective: Building a Research Practice Ethic within the Context of Indigenous Languages

The Indigenous Researcher as Individual and Collective: Building a Research Practice Ethic within... The Indigenous Researcher as Individual and Collective Building a Research Practice Ethic within the Context of Indigenous Languages gail dana-sacco We Indigenous scholars can exercise more proactive leadership by practicing critical introspection and building strength and capacity from within our communities. By critical introspection I mean a regular, rigorous, reflective self-evaluation process in which we consider our Indigenous research and scholarship practice in the context of our accountability to the collective. This evaluation should consider how Indigenous languages can inform our practice. It's not enough to ask only how we can be supportive of tribal communities; we must also practice personal accountability to our communities. We bring ourselves into the work with all our strengths, limitations, and complexities. Recognizing personal accountability to the larger collective is a humbling experience that helps us to understand not just who we are in the community but the legacy of our families and all the sacrifices large and small that have been made on our behalf. I wish to illustrate how the complex, vibrant, textured interweaving of a reflexive Indigenous research practice that examines our relationships with Indigenous languages can contribute to building self-determining communities. Reflexivity in qualitative research requires critical reflection http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

The Indigenous Researcher as Individual and Collective: Building a Research Practice Ethic within the Context of Indigenous Languages

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 34 (1) – Feb 6, 2009

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Indigenous Researcher as Individual and Collective Building a Research Practice Ethic within the Context of Indigenous Languages gail dana-sacco We Indigenous scholars can exercise more proactive leadership by practicing critical introspection and building strength and capacity from within our communities. By critical introspection I mean a regular, rigorous, reflective self-evaluation process in which we consider our Indigenous research and scholarship practice in the context of our accountability to the collective. This evaluation should consider how Indigenous languages can inform our practice. It's not enough to ask only how we can be supportive of tribal communities; we must also practice personal accountability to our communities. We bring ourselves into the work with all our strengths, limitations, and complexities. Recognizing personal accountability to the larger collective is a humbling experience that helps us to understand not just who we are in the community but the legacy of our families and all the sacrifices large and small that have been made on our behalf. I wish to illustrate how the complex, vibrant, textured interweaving of a reflexive Indigenous research practice that examines our relationships with Indigenous languages can contribute to building self-determining communities. Reflexivity in qualitative research requires critical reflection

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 6, 2009

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