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The J/Jota in Jenni

The J/Jota in Jenni Deborah R. Vargas enni Rivera was to banda music as banda music was to the cultural imaginary of 1990s Los Angeles, Mexico. Born Dolores Janney Rivera Saavedra on July 2, 1969, in Long Beach, California, to Pedro and Rosa— undocumented im- migrants from Sonora and Jalisco, Mexico— Jenni was the eldest of six children. As her career unfolded, Jenni was anointed by her fans and the music press alike as “la diva de la banda,” and at the time of her passing in December 2012, she was arguably one of the most powerful music icons in Mexican banda, narcocorrido, and ranchera music. In the years before her untimely death, Jenni was gaining rec- ognition by an even wider Spanish- language viewing public through producing and appearing on the television shows I Love Jenni and La Voz, Mexico’s version of The Voice. Jenni Rivera had an especially strong fan base among mexicanas across Mexico and Mexican ranchera and narcocorrido music fan bases in cities across the 1 I borrow the term “Los Angeles, Mexico,” from a billboard advertising Noticias 62, a Spanish- language news station in Los Angeles and surrounding cities aired on KRCA Clear Channel 62. The Noticias 62 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612

Abstract

Deborah R. Vargas enni Rivera was to banda music as banda music was to the cultural imaginary of 1990s Los Angeles, Mexico. Born Dolores Janney Rivera Saavedra on July 2, 1969, in Long Beach, California, to Pedro and Rosa— undocumented im- migrants from Sonora and Jalisco, Mexico— Jenni was the eldest of six children. As her career unfolded, Jenni was anointed by her fans and the music press alike as “la diva de la banda,” and at the time of her passing in December 2012, she was arguably one of the most powerful music icons in Mexican banda, narcocorrido, and ranchera music. In the years before her untimely death, Jenni was gaining rec- ognition by an even wider Spanish- language viewing public through producing and appearing on the television shows I Love Jenni and La Voz, Mexico’s version of The Voice. Jenni Rivera had an especially strong fan base among mexicanas across Mexico and Mexican ranchera and narcocorrido music fan bases in cities across the 1 I borrow the term “Los Angeles, Mexico,” from a billboard advertising Noticias 62, a Spanish- language news station in Los Angeles and surrounding cities aired on KRCA Clear Channel 62. The Noticias 62

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 17, 2018

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