The "Hidden Side" of the New Economy: On Transnational Migration, Domestic Work, and Unprecedented Intimacy

The "Hidden Side" of the New Economy: On Transnational Migration, Domestic Work, and... The "Hidden Side" of the New Economy On Transnational Migration, Domestic Work, and Unprecedented Intimacy encarnación gutiérrez rodríguez introduction Migration is a topic that occupies the front page of every newspaper in Europe today. As one of the constantly reiterated items in television news, it engages politicians as well as scholars. In times of globalization, migration is viewed both as a cause and a consequence of the intensive exchange of commodities, goods, and capital across national borders. This phenomenon is, however, not new. After all, during colonial times,1 migratory movements occurred that were, as Kien Nghi Ha stresses, at least "bidirectional" and tied to complex relations of power.2 Today, traces of colonialism inform the patterns, modes, and cultural narratives of migration. Transnational migration has evolved in a global setting marked by postcolonial cultural, economic, and political relationships, as well as by new forms of imperial power. Within this historical context and global conjuncture I would like to discuss the "hidden side" of the new economy: care and domestic work. As Eleonore Kofman and Parvati Raghuram3 note with reference to Arlie Russell Hochschild,4 care and domestic work (and I also would suggest sex work) form part of global-gendered inequalities http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

The "Hidden Side" of the New Economy: On Transnational Migration, Domestic Work, and Unprecedented Intimacy

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Frontiers Editorial Collective. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

The "Hidden Side" of the New Economy On Transnational Migration, Domestic Work, and Unprecedented Intimacy encarnación gutiérrez rodríguez introduction Migration is a topic that occupies the front page of every newspaper in Europe today. As one of the constantly reiterated items in television news, it engages politicians as well as scholars. In times of globalization, migration is viewed both as a cause and a consequence of the intensive exchange of commodities, goods, and capital across national borders. This phenomenon is, however, not new. After all, during colonial times,1 migratory movements occurred that were, as Kien Nghi Ha stresses, at least "bidirectional" and tied to complex relations of power.2 Today, traces of colonialism inform the patterns, modes, and cultural narratives of migration. Transnational migration has evolved in a global setting marked by postcolonial cultural, economic, and political relationships, as well as by new forms of imperial power. Within this historical context and global conjuncture I would like to discuss the "hidden side" of the new economy: care and domestic work. As Eleonore Kofman and Parvati Raghuram3 note with reference to Arlie Russell Hochschild,4 care and domestic work (and I also would suggest sex work) form part of global-gendered inequalities

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 15, 2007

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