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The Etruscan (review)

The Etruscan (review) Reviews The speaker continues to question God and to wonder if God even feels "the ovens of time" "where matter is born again / as energy" (38 ­ 39). In other poems death is revisited as well, with a slightly different tone. "When the dead come back" is a good example of ways Kercheval explores death's ephemeral nature, in this case, the relationship between the living and the dead. The first line, which continues the sentence that the title begins, notes: only their hands have substance. They use them to brush the hair back from your forehead, to pluck at your coat sleeve. They are as they were when you knew them. (1­7) Yet the living do not experience "the rest of [the dead's] bodies" (18). In other poems the dead are present in what they leave behind, like a dead woman's wisteria in "August in My Neighbor's Garden," or the memories of the "sad pie" in "Blue Plate." In the last section of the book, the poem "The Great Molasses Flood" yokes history (an account of a disastrous flood of scalding sugar), Magdalena's response to her great-grandfather's death, and the speaker's meditation on God whom she swears http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

The Etruscan (review)

Prairie Schooner , Volume 79 (4) – May 18, 2005

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1542-426X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews The speaker continues to question God and to wonder if God even feels "the ovens of time" "where matter is born again / as energy" (38 ­ 39). In other poems death is revisited as well, with a slightly different tone. "When the dead come back" is a good example of ways Kercheval explores death's ephemeral nature, in this case, the relationship between the living and the dead. The first line, which continues the sentence that the title begins, notes: only their hands have substance. They use them to brush the hair back from your forehead, to pluck at your coat sleeve. They are as they were when you knew them. (1­7) Yet the living do not experience "the rest of [the dead's] bodies" (18). In other poems the dead are present in what they leave behind, like a dead woman's wisteria in "August in My Neighbor's Garden," or the memories of the "sad pie" in "Blue Plate." In the last section of the book, the poem "The Great Molasses Flood" yokes history (an account of a disastrous flood of scalding sugar), Magdalena's response to her great-grandfather's death, and the speaker's meditation on God whom she swears

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 18, 2005

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