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The Etat Civil: Post/colonial Identities and Genre

The Etat Civil: Post/colonial Identities and Genre Patrick Crowley The Etat Civil Post/colonial Identities and Genre Naming peoples and places was a central feature of colonial and imperial enterprises: to name was to have dominion, or at least the illusion of control that colonial administrators sought to make real. The attempt to regulate, in some way, the name of the colonial subject by inserting it into the standard format of the état civil--nom followed by prénom--was, however, even more problematic as it involved changes in social practice and tradition. This article examines the role of the name in two post/colonial Francophone texts and, in doing so, questions contemporary French pragmatic approaches to genre that emphasize the relationship between the stability of the individual's name, as inscribed within the état civil, and the generic status of the text. The opening section of this article is a brief consideration of the relationship between genre and the name as viewed by pragmatic theorists of genre; the second part offers examples of two francophone texts in which the name is put in play. The first is Kateb Yacine's Nedjma which was published as a novel in 1956 and the second is Patrick Chamoiseau's Une enfance créole ii: Chemin d'école, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

The Etat Civil: Post/colonial Identities and Genre

French Forum , Volume 29 (3) – Feb 3, 2004

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836
Publisher site
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Abstract

Patrick Crowley The Etat Civil Post/colonial Identities and Genre Naming peoples and places was a central feature of colonial and imperial enterprises: to name was to have dominion, or at least the illusion of control that colonial administrators sought to make real. The attempt to regulate, in some way, the name of the colonial subject by inserting it into the standard format of the état civil--nom followed by prénom--was, however, even more problematic as it involved changes in social practice and tradition. This article examines the role of the name in two post/colonial Francophone texts and, in doing so, questions contemporary French pragmatic approaches to genre that emphasize the relationship between the stability of the individual's name, as inscribed within the état civil, and the generic status of the text. The opening section of this article is a brief consideration of the relationship between genre and the name as viewed by pragmatic theorists of genre; the second part offers examples of two francophone texts in which the name is put in play. The first is Kateb Yacine's Nedjma which was published as a novel in 1956 and the second is Patrick Chamoiseau's Une enfance créole ii: Chemin d'école,

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 3, 2004

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