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The Emergence, Renaissance, and Transformation of Multicultural American Literature from the 1960s to the Early 2000s

The Emergence, Renaissance, and Transformation of Multicultural American Literature from the... THE EMERGENCE, RENAISSANCE, AND TRANSFORMATION OF MULTICULTURAL AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM THE 1960S TO THE EARLY 2000S W. LAWRENCE HOGUE Writers of color in the U.S. have been producing novels, poetry, and essays in American letters since the eighteenth century, particularly African American writers. But before the social, cultural, and political movements and forces of the 1960s, very little literature by writers of color was institutionalized and/or in print. For example, before the 1970s, Three Negro Classics, comprising of Booker T. Washington’s Up From Slavery, Du Bois’ The Souls of Black Folk, and James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of An Ex-Colored Man, was the most visible text by African Americans readily available. Although Richard Wright’s Native Son (1940) and Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1953) remained in print, the bulk of African American literature was out of print until the 1970s. Although American Indians had been writing fi ction, which was also consistently out of print, since the latter half of the nineteenth century, it was the publication of N. Scott Momaday’s (Kiowa) House Made of Dawn in 1968, which garnered the Pulitzer Prize for literature, Vine Deloria, Jr.’s Custer Died for Your Sins in 1969, and Dee Brown’s best-selling revisionist http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke uni_neb

The Emergence, Renaissance, and Transformation of Multicultural American Literature from the 1960s to the Early 2000s

symploke , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 28, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627

Abstract

THE EMERGENCE, RENAISSANCE, AND TRANSFORMATION OF MULTICULTURAL AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM THE 1960S TO THE EARLY 2000S W. LAWRENCE HOGUE Writers of color in the U.S. have been producing novels, poetry, and essays in American letters since the eighteenth century, particularly African American writers. But before the social, cultural, and political movements and forces of the 1960s, very little literature by writers of color was institutionalized and/or in print. For example, before the 1970s, Three Negro Classics, comprising of Booker T. Washington’s Up From Slavery, Du Bois’ The Souls of Black Folk, and James Weldon Johnson’s The Autobiography of An Ex-Colored Man, was the most visible text by African Americans readily available. Although Richard Wright’s Native Son (1940) and Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man (1953) remained in print, the bulk of African American literature was out of print until the 1970s. Although American Indians had been writing fi ction, which was also consistently out of print, since the latter half of the nineteenth century, it was the publication of N. Scott Momaday’s (Kiowa) House Made of Dawn in 1968, which garnered the Pulitzer Prize for literature, Vine Deloria, Jr.’s Custer Died for Your Sins in 1969, and Dee Brown’s best-selling revisionist

Journal

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Published: Nov 28, 2018

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