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The Ecology of Kandinsky's Abstraction: A Trembling World of Beings and Things

The Ecology of Kandinsky's Abstraction: A Trembling World of Beings and Things THE ECOLOGY OF KANDINSKY’S ABSTRACTION: A TREMBLING WORLD OF BEINGS AND THINGS ISABEL SOBRAL CAMPOS Everything “dead” trembled. Everything showed me its face, its innermost being, its secret soul, inclined more often to silence than speech—not only the stars, moon, words, fl owers of which poets sing, but even a cigar butt lying in the ashtray, a patient white trouser-button looking up at you from a puddle on the street, a submissive piece of bark carried through the long grass in the ant’s strong jaws to some uncertain and vital end, the page of a calendar, torn forcibly by one’s consciously outstretched hand from the warm companionship of the block of remaining pages. Likewise, every still and every moving point (= line) became for me just as alive and revealed to me its soul. This was enough for me to “comprehend,” with my entire being and with all my senses, the possibility and existence of that art which today is called “abstract,” as opposed, to “objective” —Wassily Kandinsky (1994, 361). In this revelatory passage from the autobiographical text Reminiscences published in 1913, Kandinsky clearly states his view on the organic and the inorganic world of objects. His approach seems http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

The Ecology of Kandinsky's Abstraction: A Trembling World of Beings and Things

symploke , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 28, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627

Abstract

THE ECOLOGY OF KANDINSKY’S ABSTRACTION: A TREMBLING WORLD OF BEINGS AND THINGS ISABEL SOBRAL CAMPOS Everything “dead” trembled. Everything showed me its face, its innermost being, its secret soul, inclined more often to silence than speech—not only the stars, moon, words, fl owers of which poets sing, but even a cigar butt lying in the ashtray, a patient white trouser-button looking up at you from a puddle on the street, a submissive piece of bark carried through the long grass in the ant’s strong jaws to some uncertain and vital end, the page of a calendar, torn forcibly by one’s consciously outstretched hand from the warm companionship of the block of remaining pages. Likewise, every still and every moving point (= line) became for me just as alive and revealed to me its soul. This was enough for me to “comprehend,” with my entire being and with all my senses, the possibility and existence of that art which today is called “abstract,” as opposed, to “objective” —Wassily Kandinsky (1994, 361). In this revelatory passage from the autobiographical text Reminiscences published in 1913, Kandinsky clearly states his view on the organic and the inorganic world of objects. His approach seems

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 28, 2018

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