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The Domestic Workers Convention Is Not Enough: A Postcolonial Feminist View of Ethiopian and Filipino Domestic Workers in Iraqi Kurdistan

The Domestic Workers Convention Is Not Enough: A Postcolonial Feminist View of Ethiopian and... The Domestic Workers Convention Is Not Enough A Postcolonial Feminist View of Ethiopian and Filipino Domestic Workers in Iraqi Kurdistan Katherine Carter and Judy Aulette Introduction More than 232 million international migrants exist in the world and nearly half of them (48 percent) are women.1 Women have always migrated across the globe. The large numbers of women who migrate today and the long distances they travel, however, are something new. Many of these women earn money as care workers providing for the physical, psychological, emotional, and developmental needs of their employers.2 The typical pattern is for women to leave their own families and migrate from poor countries in the global South in order to work in wealthy countries in the global North, what Hochschild terms "global chains of care."3 Women migrating across the world to work as nannies and housekeepers are part of the "hidden side" of the global economy, where their work is characterized by the ironic coupling of unprecedented intimacy with exploitation and abuse.4 While we usually think about this international migration as people moving from the global South to the North, South-South migration is roughly as high as South-North migration.5 What makes South-South migration attractive http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

The Domestic Workers Convention Is Not Enough: A Postcolonial Feminist View of Ethiopian and Filipino Domestic Workers in Iraqi Kurdistan

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 37 (3) – Oct 22, 2016

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Domestic Workers Convention Is Not Enough A Postcolonial Feminist View of Ethiopian and Filipino Domestic Workers in Iraqi Kurdistan Katherine Carter and Judy Aulette Introduction More than 232 million international migrants exist in the world and nearly half of them (48 percent) are women.1 Women have always migrated across the globe. The large numbers of women who migrate today and the long distances they travel, however, are something new. Many of these women earn money as care workers providing for the physical, psychological, emotional, and developmental needs of their employers.2 The typical pattern is for women to leave their own families and migrate from poor countries in the global South in order to work in wealthy countries in the global North, what Hochschild terms "global chains of care."3 Women migrating across the world to work as nannies and housekeepers are part of the "hidden side" of the global economy, where their work is characterized by the ironic coupling of unprecedented intimacy with exploitation and abuse.4 While we usually think about this international migration as people moving from the global South to the North, South-South migration is roughly as high as South-North migration.5 What makes South-South migration attractive

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 22, 2016

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