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The Dirt is Red Here: Art and Poetry from Native California (review)

The Dirt is Red Here: Art and Poetry from Native California (review) SAIL . SPRING 2004 . VOL. 16, NO. 1 Margaret Dubin, ed. The Dirt is Red Here: Art and Poetry from Native California. Berkeley: Heyday Books, 2002. 82 pp. Cari M. Carpenter Readers of this rich collection of poetry, photography, painting, mixed media, and performance art are likely to appreciate the editor's presentation of California Indians as persisting, diverse peoples who are defining themselves. Tribes of this region share certain characteristics that distinguish them from many other indigenous groups, lending credence to the category of "California Indians" that the book is organized around: early interactions with Spanish peoples, which are evident in the rancherias that in many cases take the place of reservations; tribes like the Chukchansis that exist outside the radar of most Americans' image of "Indians"; and the urban relocation to places like San Francisco that was so crucial to some of the AIM actions of the 1960s and 70s. However, given the historically contested state and national borders of California--think for example of the Kumeyaay Indians, who preserve their connections to Indians of Baja, Mexico--it seems somewhat odd to maintain such loyalty to this geographic and political concept. Indeed, certain pieces suggest that this collection http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

The Dirt is Red Here: Art and Poetry from Native California (review)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Cari M. Carpenter
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
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Abstract

SAIL . SPRING 2004 . VOL. 16, NO. 1 Margaret Dubin, ed. The Dirt is Red Here: Art and Poetry from Native California. Berkeley: Heyday Books, 2002. 82 pp. Cari M. Carpenter Readers of this rich collection of poetry, photography, painting, mixed media, and performance art are likely to appreciate the editor's presentation of California Indians as persisting, diverse peoples who are defining themselves. Tribes of this region share certain characteristics that distinguish them from many other indigenous groups, lending credence to the category of "California Indians" that the book is organized around: early interactions with Spanish peoples, which are evident in the rancherias that in many cases take the place of reservations; tribes like the Chukchansis that exist outside the radar of most Americans' image of "Indians"; and the urban relocation to places like San Francisco that was so crucial to some of the AIM actions of the 1960s and 70s. However, given the historically contested state and national borders of California--think for example of the Kumeyaay Indians, who preserve their connections to Indians of Baja, Mexico--it seems somewhat odd to maintain such loyalty to this geographic and political concept. Indeed, certain pieces suggest that this collection

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 4, 2004

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