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The Dirt is Red Here: Art and Poetry from Native California (review)

The Dirt is Red Here: Art and Poetry from Native California (review) expressionist, "Indian Land," are no less political but altogether more aesthetically oriented, and they, too, are impossible to gloss over. sail . summer 2004 . vol. 16, no. 2 Even so, the artist whose work I kept coming back to is Rick Bartow. I've always admired his paintings, but for me, they stood out beyond anything else in the book. A cross between Smith, Scholder, Francis Bacon, and Paul Klee, Bartow's canvases simultaneously startle and appeal. The figures, whether foxes or bears or birds are both petroglyphic and simply graphic. There always seems to be more going on in them than mere representation, and the paintings' ground is both uncertain and structured--a reality that is always another reality. And yet not. And then there are the colors. I tend not to be moved by the wispy primary colored canvases in every gallery in Santa Fe, but Bartow problematizes the color schemes in his work. They are always in dialogue with the figures, instead of in service to them. His painting on the title page, "Coyote and the Dust Devil XVI" is marvelous. For some time now, I have had a vision for a book about Native Oklahoma. It http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures uni_neb

The Dirt is Red Here: Art and Poetry from Native California (review)

Studies in American Indian Literatures , Volume 16 (2) – Jul 8, 2004

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Dean Rader
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
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Abstract

expressionist, "Indian Land," are no less political but altogether more aesthetically oriented, and they, too, are impossible to gloss over. sail . summer 2004 . vol. 16, no. 2 Even so, the artist whose work I kept coming back to is Rick Bartow. I've always admired his paintings, but for me, they stood out beyond anything else in the book. A cross between Smith, Scholder, Francis Bacon, and Paul Klee, Bartow's canvases simultaneously startle and appeal. The figures, whether foxes or bears or birds are both petroglyphic and simply graphic. There always seems to be more going on in them than mere representation, and the paintings' ground is both uncertain and structured--a reality that is always another reality. And yet not. And then there are the colors. I tend not to be moved by the wispy primary colored canvases in every gallery in Santa Fe, but Bartow problematizes the color schemes in his work. They are always in dialogue with the figures, instead of in service to them. His painting on the title page, "Coyote and the Dust Devil XVI" is marvelous. For some time now, I have had a vision for a book about Native Oklahoma. It

Journal

Studies in American Indian Literaturesuni_neb

Published: Jul 8, 2004

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