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The Development of a Gaming Enterprise for the Navajo Nation

The Development of a Gaming Enterprise for the Navajo Nation Susan Fae Carder Since the late nineteenth century, federal policy affecting the Navajo has vacillated between efforts to assimilate the people (the Diné) into the dominant non-Native population and policies of various kinds of federal support for tribal communities and the Navajo Nation. Beginning in the 1970s, the federal government recognized in practice the sovereignty of the Navajo Nation and began granting enhanced decisionmaking powers to tribal leaders over the nation's affairs. This shift in policies supported self-determination for the Diné, a major goal of Native people. Self-determination has found its most controversial expression in the development of tribal casinos.1 This study of Navajo gaming considers the importance of oral tradition, the impact of cultural integration, and the economic potential gaming presents for the Navajo Nation. It also provides a view of the Diné experience within the broader scope of the development of Indian gaming in the United States and the resulting cultural and economic impact gaming has had on Native American populations in general. Navajo Dependency By the beginning of the twentieth century, due to the effects of environmental changes, subsistence economies, and social changes, the needs of Native Americans were of little consequence to the dominant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

The Development of a Gaming Enterprise for the Navajo Nation

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 40 (4) – Jan 6, 2016

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

Susan Fae Carder Since the late nineteenth century, federal policy affecting the Navajo has vacillated between efforts to assimilate the people (the Diné) into the dominant non-Native population and policies of various kinds of federal support for tribal communities and the Navajo Nation. Beginning in the 1970s, the federal government recognized in practice the sovereignty of the Navajo Nation and began granting enhanced decisionmaking powers to tribal leaders over the nation's affairs. This shift in policies supported self-determination for the Diné, a major goal of Native people. Self-determination has found its most controversial expression in the development of tribal casinos.1 This study of Navajo gaming considers the importance of oral tradition, the impact of cultural integration, and the economic potential gaming presents for the Navajo Nation. It also provides a view of the Diné experience within the broader scope of the development of Indian gaming in the United States and the resulting cultural and economic impact gaming has had on Native American populations in general. Navajo Dependency By the beginning of the twentieth century, due to the effects of environmental changes, subsistence economies, and social changes, the needs of Native Americans were of little consequence to the dominant

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 6, 2016

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