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The Count of Chanteleine: A Tale of the French Revolution by Jules Verne (review)

The Count of Chanteleine: A Tale of the French Revolution by Jules Verne (review) French Forum Winter/Spring 2013 Vol. 38, Nos. 1­2 Such far-reaching conclusions should prove of great interest to all scholars of the French Revolution, not just experts on lyric theater. Can we trust, however, that what holds true for the Paris Opéra also applies to other (spoken) theaters? This question raises, to my eyes, a rare weakness of Darlow's book: the relationship between lyric theater and spoken theater is not always as clear as it could have been. On several occasions, Darlow describes his analysis of the Paris Opéra as a "case study," suggesting that the conclusions he reaches are broadly applicable to other forms of Revolutionary theater. Accordingly, he often draws examples from spoken theater of the period, explaining midway through the book that this allows him "to sketch the context in which the Opéra was working" (141). Yet he also repeatedly flags key differences between lyric and spoken theater. In the introduction, he notes that "musical sensibility has different implications for reception than does spoken theater" (10) and that the opera was perceived at the time to be a culturally elitist, luxurious realm of irreality, wholly detached from contemporary events--very different characteristics from those of the spoken http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

The Count of Chanteleine: A Tale of the French Revolution by Jules Verne (review)

French Forum , Volume 38 (1) – Oct 11, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836
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Abstract

French Forum Winter/Spring 2013 Vol. 38, Nos. 1­2 Such far-reaching conclusions should prove of great interest to all scholars of the French Revolution, not just experts on lyric theater. Can we trust, however, that what holds true for the Paris Opéra also applies to other (spoken) theaters? This question raises, to my eyes, a rare weakness of Darlow's book: the relationship between lyric theater and spoken theater is not always as clear as it could have been. On several occasions, Darlow describes his analysis of the Paris Opéra as a "case study," suggesting that the conclusions he reaches are broadly applicable to other forms of Revolutionary theater. Accordingly, he often draws examples from spoken theater of the period, explaining midway through the book that this allows him "to sketch the context in which the Opéra was working" (141). Yet he also repeatedly flags key differences between lyric and spoken theater. In the introduction, he notes that "musical sensibility has different implications for reception than does spoken theater" (10) and that the opera was perceived at the time to be a culturally elitist, luxurious realm of irreality, wholly detached from contemporary events--very different characteristics from those of the spoken

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 11, 2013

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