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The Cherokee Phoenix : Resistance and Accommodation

The Cherokee Phoenix : Resistance and Accommodation f i e l d n ote s The Cherokee Phoenix Resistance and Accommodation mikhelle lynn ross-mulkey The Cherokee Phoenix was the first known American Indian newspaper and the first bilingual newspaper to use an American Indian language. The Cherokee Nation's own press was used to publish the Phoenix from 1828 to 1834. This time period coincides with increasing pressure for Indian removal and the subsequent Georgia land lottery, Worcester v. Georgia, the Indian Removal Bill of 1830, and the discovery of gold in parts of the Cherokee Nation.1 However, with all of this going on, the Phoenix and its supporters, along with strong leadership and the use of federal courts, held off Cherokee removal for another eight years after the act was originally passed. These different acts of resistant and struggle are highlighted in the Cherokee Phoenix as well as through extant personal letters written by Cherokee people.2 The story of the Cherokee Phoenix, although complicated and layered, can offer a reflection of the Cherokee response to removal. The Phoenix was a literary tool meant to challenge the behaviors of some white Americans that clearly threatened Cherokee survival. This article adds to the ongoing Cherokee scholarship by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native South University of Nebraska Press

The Cherokee Phoenix : Resistance and Accommodation

Native South , Volume 5 (1) – Aug 19, 2012

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4025
Publisher site
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Abstract

f i e l d n ote s The Cherokee Phoenix Resistance and Accommodation mikhelle lynn ross-mulkey The Cherokee Phoenix was the first known American Indian newspaper and the first bilingual newspaper to use an American Indian language. The Cherokee Nation's own press was used to publish the Phoenix from 1828 to 1834. This time period coincides with increasing pressure for Indian removal and the subsequent Georgia land lottery, Worcester v. Georgia, the Indian Removal Bill of 1830, and the discovery of gold in parts of the Cherokee Nation.1 However, with all of this going on, the Phoenix and its supporters, along with strong leadership and the use of federal courts, held off Cherokee removal for another eight years after the act was originally passed. These different acts of resistant and struggle are highlighted in the Cherokee Phoenix as well as through extant personal letters written by Cherokee people.2 The story of the Cherokee Phoenix, although complicated and layered, can offer a reflection of the Cherokee response to removal. The Phoenix was a literary tool meant to challenge the behaviors of some white Americans that clearly threatened Cherokee survival. This article adds to the ongoing Cherokee scholarship by

Journal

Native SouthUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 19, 2012

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