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"The animating influences of Discord": Margaret Fuller in 1844

"The animating influences of Discord": Margaret Fuller in 1844 Susan Belasco University of Nebraska, Lincoln On 20 December 1844, readers of the NewYork Tribune, engaged by the usual miscellany of a newspaper--an article on prison reform by Lydia Maria Child, news of anti-slavery activities in Kentucky, and notices about lectures and amusements--would have also noticed two items, appearing side by side in columns on page two. In one column appears an indignant letter from Ralph Waldo Emerson protesting what he saw as the Tribune's inadequate coverage of Massachusetts Judge Samuel Hoar's expulsion from South Carolina. Hoar, an emissary sent by the Massachusetts government, had failed in his efforts to lobby the South Carolina legislature to stop the practice of imprisoning free black sailors aboard ships from Massachusetts and then selling them into slavery. Emerson and others from Massachusetts were incensed by Hoar's treatment in South Carolina and unhappy with the initial coverage in the Tribune. In the next column appears Margaret Fuller's enthusiastic review of the New York performance of "Niagara" by the popular Norwegian violinist and composer, Ole Bornemann Bull, then completing a tour of the United States. The juxtaposition of the two columns is a suggestive moment in the histories legacy, vol. 20, nos. 1 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy University of Nebraska Press

"The animating influences of Discord": Margaret Fuller in 1844

Legacy , Volume 20 (1) – Nov 18, 2003

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Nebraska.
ISSN
1534-0643
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Abstract

Susan Belasco University of Nebraska, Lincoln On 20 December 1844, readers of the NewYork Tribune, engaged by the usual miscellany of a newspaper--an article on prison reform by Lydia Maria Child, news of anti-slavery activities in Kentucky, and notices about lectures and amusements--would have also noticed two items, appearing side by side in columns on page two. In one column appears an indignant letter from Ralph Waldo Emerson protesting what he saw as the Tribune's inadequate coverage of Massachusetts Judge Samuel Hoar's expulsion from South Carolina. Hoar, an emissary sent by the Massachusetts government, had failed in his efforts to lobby the South Carolina legislature to stop the practice of imprisoning free black sailors aboard ships from Massachusetts and then selling them into slavery. Emerson and others from Massachusetts were incensed by Hoar's treatment in South Carolina and unhappy with the initial coverage in the Tribune. In the next column appears Margaret Fuller's enthusiastic review of the New York performance of "Niagara" by the popular Norwegian violinist and composer, Ole Bornemann Bull, then completing a tour of the United States. The juxtaposition of the two columns is a suggestive moment in the histories legacy, vol. 20, nos. 1

Journal

LegacyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 18, 2003

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