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Teaching about Sexual Violence in Higher Education: Moving from Concern to Conscious Resistance

Teaching about Sexual Violence in Higher Education: Moving from Concern to Conscious Resistance Teaching about Sexual Violence in Higher Education Moving from Concern to Conscious Resistance corrine c. bertram and m. sue crowley introduction Sexual violence against women remains as serious a problem today as it was in the 1970s. Two generations after radical feminists brought the ugly realities of that violence to the forefront, little of significance about the prevalence or consequences of sexual violence has changed. With that in mind the focus on sexual violence and pedagogy in this paper is based on three interrelated factors. First, sexual violence is understood to be a complex set of cultural practices used to enforce and maintain not only sexism but multiple forms of oppression. Second, the traumas produced by that violence provide a nexus from which to explore how oppressions operate to divide women (and men) across racial and class lines. And finally, survivors are the focal point for analysis because the lived reality of sexual trauma is a bodily enactment of power. As Cvetkovich writes, "trauma becomes the hinge between systemic structures of exploitation and oppression and the felt experience of them."1 The paper is organized into three main sections. We begin with an analysis of five obstacles to change http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Teaching about Sexual Violence in Higher Education: Moving from Concern to Conscious Resistance

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

Teaching about Sexual Violence in Higher Education Moving from Concern to Conscious Resistance corrine c. bertram and m. sue crowley introduction Sexual violence against women remains as serious a problem today as it was in the 1970s. Two generations after radical feminists brought the ugly realities of that violence to the forefront, little of significance about the prevalence or consequences of sexual violence has changed. With that in mind the focus on sexual violence and pedagogy in this paper is based on three interrelated factors. First, sexual violence is understood to be a complex set of cultural practices used to enforce and maintain not only sexism but multiple forms of oppression. Second, the traumas produced by that violence provide a nexus from which to explore how oppressions operate to divide women (and men) across racial and class lines. And finally, survivors are the focal point for analysis because the lived reality of sexual trauma is a bodily enactment of power. As Cvetkovich writes, "trauma becomes the hinge between systemic structures of exploitation and oppression and the felt experience of them."1 The paper is organized into three main sections. We begin with an analysis of five obstacles to change

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 20, 2012

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