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Tattoo, Santa Nina de Mochis, California Fashions Slaves, and Our Lady

Tattoo, Santa Nina de Mochis, California Fashions Slaves, and Our Lady alma lopez One the earliest digital prints I created was California Fashions Slaves. This digital print portrays my mother as a seamstress, and as a part of a working poor community racially stereotyped and vilified for allegedly draining the United States economy. Santa Niña de Mochis is dedicated to my maternal grandmother. The little girl in white was photographed during a family visit to my grandmother's graveside in Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Mexico, in 1997. Tattoo references the Virgin of Guadalupe. These are tattoos I've seen typically on men's backs. However, they are presented here on a woman's back, and the Virgin of Guadalupe is in an embrace with the mermaid of the popular Mexican game of Loteria. Our Lady is a small digital print completed in 1999 and features two of my friends, performance artist Raquel Salinas as a contemporary Virgin dressed in roses and cultural activist Raquel Gutierrez as a nude butterfly angel. The two Raquels and I grew up in Los Angeles with the image of the Virgin of Guadalupe in our homes and community. Our Lady was inspired by Raquel Salinas's one-person performance titled "Heat Your Own," Raquel Gutierrez's experiences in Catholic school, and by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Tattoo, Santa Nina de Mochis, California Fashions Slaves, and Our Lady

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 23 (1) – Jan 4, 2002

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

alma lopez One the earliest digital prints I created was California Fashions Slaves. This digital print portrays my mother as a seamstress, and as a part of a working poor community racially stereotyped and vilified for allegedly draining the United States economy. Santa Niña de Mochis is dedicated to my maternal grandmother. The little girl in white was photographed during a family visit to my grandmother's graveside in Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Mexico, in 1997. Tattoo references the Virgin of Guadalupe. These are tattoos I've seen typically on men's backs. However, they are presented here on a woman's back, and the Virgin of Guadalupe is in an embrace with the mermaid of the popular Mexican game of Loteria. Our Lady is a small digital print completed in 1999 and features two of my friends, performance artist Raquel Salinas as a contemporary Virgin dressed in roses and cultural activist Raquel Gutierrez as a nude butterfly angel. The two Raquels and I grew up in Los Angeles with the image of the Virgin of Guadalupe in our homes and community. Our Lady was inspired by Raquel Salinas's one-person performance titled "Heat Your Own," Raquel Gutierrez's experiences in Catholic school, and by

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 4, 2002

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