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Sounding Out! (review)

Sounding Out! (review) Even within her thematic rubric, biographical portraits of key artists would have been welcome and could have easily expanded her appendix, "Dreamgirls: A Star-Gazer's Guide to Musicians." Perhaps the most useful aspect of Songs in Black and Lavender is the wealth of transcribed interview material with an important range of black musicians, participants, and organizers. Hayes wields a light touch in editing the often-lengthy interview passages. She has done the field a great service by having so many voices accessible and on record. These include the prominent voices of Linda Tillery and Judith Casselberry, next-generation musicians Nedra Johnson, Malika, and Naya'Hri Suhalia, and other musicians, festigoers, activists, and organizers. Hayes hopes to reach an audience of general readers, specialists, and undergraduates, and she surely will. This study is rigorous but written in accessible and humorous language. Beyond the undergraduate classes for which its author aims, Songs will also be of great use to those teaching graduate courses in ethnomusicology, gender/queer studies, women's studies, and black studies. I, for one, am happy to have this important reference on my shelf. Sounding Out! By Madelyn Byrne, Renee T. Coulombe, Linda Dusman, Mara Helmuth, Kristin Norderval, and Anna Rubin. Redland, FL: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Even within her thematic rubric, biographical portraits of key artists would have been welcome and could have easily expanded her appendix, "Dreamgirls: A Star-Gazer's Guide to Musicians." Perhaps the most useful aspect of Songs in Black and Lavender is the wealth of transcribed interview material with an important range of black musicians, participants, and organizers. Hayes wields a light touch in editing the often-lengthy interview passages. She has done the field a great service by having so many voices accessible and on record. These include the prominent voices of Linda Tillery and Judith Casselberry, next-generation musicians Nedra Johnson, Malika, and Naya'Hri Suhalia, and other musicians, festigoers, activists, and organizers. Hayes hopes to reach an audience of general readers, specialists, and undergraduates, and she surely will. This study is rigorous but written in accessible and humorous language. Beyond the undergraduate classes for which its author aims, Songs will also be of great use to those teaching graduate courses in ethnomusicology, gender/queer studies, women's studies, and black studies. I, for one, am happy to have this important reference on my shelf. Sounding Out! By Madelyn Byrne, Renee T. Coulombe, Linda Dusman, Mara Helmuth, Kristin Norderval, and Anna Rubin. Redland, FL:

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 9, 2012

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