Skin Deep: Bodies without Limits in Hiroshima mon amour

Skin Deep: Bodies without Limits in Hiroshima mon amour Skin Deep Bodies without Limits in Hiroshima mon amour1 Christian Martin Depuis la Renaissance, la pensée occidentale est obnubilée par un thème épistémologique; connaître, c'est briser l'écorce pour atteindre le noyau. Ce thème arrive à épuisement, après avoir produit quelques réussites et quelques dangers: la physique du noyau n'a-t-elle pas conduit savants et militaires jusqu'à l'explosion atomique? --Didier Anzieu, Le Moi-peau The first images in Hiroshima mon amour (1959) are among the most haunting of this film written by Marguerite Duras and directed by Alain Resnais. Two bodies seem to be embracing, but in a derealized fashion: we see no faces or other identifying features, only the slow movements of this embrace. We cannot distinguish the limits between individuals, the point at which one body ends and another begins. Or rather, to be more precise, we cannot pinpoint where one skin ends and another skin begins, since this initial sequence is filmed as a close-up on human skin accompanied only by the musical score by Giovanni Fusco. As though to emphasize that the key to this scene is skin deep, the camera draws our attention to the textured surface of the embracing bodies covered by ash, which soon http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

Skin Deep: Bodies without Limits in Hiroshima mon amour

French Forum, Volume 38 (1) – Oct 11, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836
Publisher site
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Abstract

Skin Deep Bodies without Limits in Hiroshima mon amour1 Christian Martin Depuis la Renaissance, la pensée occidentale est obnubilée par un thème épistémologique; connaître, c'est briser l'écorce pour atteindre le noyau. Ce thème arrive à épuisement, après avoir produit quelques réussites et quelques dangers: la physique du noyau n'a-t-elle pas conduit savants et militaires jusqu'à l'explosion atomique? --Didier Anzieu, Le Moi-peau The first images in Hiroshima mon amour (1959) are among the most haunting of this film written by Marguerite Duras and directed by Alain Resnais. Two bodies seem to be embracing, but in a derealized fashion: we see no faces or other identifying features, only the slow movements of this embrace. We cannot distinguish the limits between individuals, the point at which one body ends and another begins. Or rather, to be more precise, we cannot pinpoint where one skin ends and another skin begins, since this initial sequence is filmed as a close-up on human skin accompanied only by the musical score by Giovanni Fusco. As though to emphasize that the key to this scene is skin deep, the camera draws our attention to the textured surface of the embracing bodies covered by ash, which soon

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 11, 2013

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