Shakespeare's Imitation Game: How Do You Solve A [Problem Set] Like Katherina?

Shakespeare's Imitation Game: How Do You Solve A [Problem Set] Like Katherina? SHAKESPEARE’S IMITATION GAME: HOW DO YOU SOLVE A [PROBLEM SET] LIKE KATHERINA? JOHN FREEMAN [Compared to a computer programmer…] No playwright, no stage director, no emperor, however powerful, has ever exercised such absolute authority to arrange a stage or a fi eld of battle and to command such unswervingly dutiful actors or troops. —Joseph Weizenbaum (1976, 115) The playwright is a kind of god in that he writes words for imaginary people which then cause real people (actors) to bring those words and those people to life. —Julian Hilton (1993, 161) Prologue Perhaps Shakespeare’s most programmatic as well as problematic play, The Taming of the Shrew operates as a formal system, set up and “run” as a program with its own special set of “functions” and “scripts” specifi cally designed to process “problem sets” encoded as plots and subplots (literary variants of the computer’s routines and subroutines). In performing these operations, the play extends the systematic parameters of conventional Renaissance comedy in its engagement of the audience in those operations. Traditionally, these parameters restrict interactions to those occurring among the characters, with little or no outreach to the audience. The fourth wall or screen between the representation and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Shakespeare's Imitation Game: How Do You Solve A [Problem Set] Like Katherina?

symploke, Volume 26 (1) – Nov 28, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/shakespeare-apos-s-imitation-game-how-do-you-solve-a-problem-set-like-Ep3dfHZndo
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627

Abstract

SHAKESPEARE’S IMITATION GAME: HOW DO YOU SOLVE A [PROBLEM SET] LIKE KATHERINA? JOHN FREEMAN [Compared to a computer programmer…] No playwright, no stage director, no emperor, however powerful, has ever exercised such absolute authority to arrange a stage or a fi eld of battle and to command such unswervingly dutiful actors or troops. —Joseph Weizenbaum (1976, 115) The playwright is a kind of god in that he writes words for imaginary people which then cause real people (actors) to bring those words and those people to life. —Julian Hilton (1993, 161) Prologue Perhaps Shakespeare’s most programmatic as well as problematic play, The Taming of the Shrew operates as a formal system, set up and “run” as a program with its own special set of “functions” and “scripts” specifi cally designed to process “problem sets” encoded as plots and subplots (literary variants of the computer’s routines and subroutines). In performing these operations, the play extends the systematic parameters of conventional Renaissance comedy in its engagement of the audience in those operations. Traditionally, these parameters restrict interactions to those occurring among the characters, with little or no outreach to the audience. The fourth wall or screen between the representation and the

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 28, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off