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Sensing History’s Hold: Touch and Black Queer Representation after Moynihan

Sensing History’s Hold: Touch and Black Queer Representation after Moynihan <p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay explores moments of touch and haptic sensation in Barry Jenkins’s film <i>Moonlight</i> (2016) and Tarell Alvin McCraney’s play <i>Choir Boy</i> (2012) to refigure the relations between black maternity and black masculinity under modernity. Drawing from contemporary black feminist theory, I analyze moments of touching and holding in the film and play as generative of alternative sensations of history. I demonstrate how black queer performances of touch exceed the captive representational logics theorized by Hortense Spillers in the wake of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s 1965 report on the black family.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Sensing History’s Hold: Touch and Black Queer Representation after Moynihan

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 42 (1) – May 5, 2021

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © Frontiers Editorial Collective, Inc
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay explores moments of touch and haptic sensation in Barry Jenkins’s film <i>Moonlight</i> (2016) and Tarell Alvin McCraney’s play <i>Choir Boy</i> (2012) to refigure the relations between black maternity and black masculinity under modernity. Drawing from contemporary black feminist theory, I analyze moments of touching and holding in the film and play as generative of alternative sensations of history. I demonstrate how black queer performances of touch exceed the captive representational logics theorized by Hortense Spillers in the wake of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s 1965 report on the black family.</p>

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 5, 2021

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