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Science in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie

Science in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie Shelley R. Block University of Missouri, Columbia and Etta M. Madden Southwest Missouri State University "Philosophers may inquire into the process of nature, and find out, if they can, how such sudden changes are produced, though, after all, I fancy their inquiries will turn out like the experiment of the inquisitive boy, who cut open the drum to find the sound; but I love to lend my imagination to poets' dreams, and to fancy nature has her myriads of little spirits. . . ." Catharine Maria Sedgwick (99) So writes the colonial American Puritan Hope Leslie to her beloved Everell Fletcher in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's novel Hope Leslie (1827). When the young woman writes of what she sees as the vain work of "philosophers," who might cut open the drum without realizing they have destroyed the source of the music, she is writing off those also known as "men of science."1 Thus the paragraph introduces a topic central to the novel--science and its relationship to literature. Not insignificant, the letter addressed to Everell Fletcher also includes Hope's narration of her tutor Cradock's snakebite and Cradock's healing by a native woman, Nelema; and it is immediately followed by another http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy University of Nebraska Press

Science in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie

Legacy , Volume 20 (1) – Nov 18, 2003

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Nebraska.
ISSN
1534-0643
Publisher site
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Abstract

Shelley R. Block University of Missouri, Columbia and Etta M. Madden Southwest Missouri State University "Philosophers may inquire into the process of nature, and find out, if they can, how such sudden changes are produced, though, after all, I fancy their inquiries will turn out like the experiment of the inquisitive boy, who cut open the drum to find the sound; but I love to lend my imagination to poets' dreams, and to fancy nature has her myriads of little spirits. . . ." Catharine Maria Sedgwick (99) So writes the colonial American Puritan Hope Leslie to her beloved Everell Fletcher in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's novel Hope Leslie (1827). When the young woman writes of what she sees as the vain work of "philosophers," who might cut open the drum without realizing they have destroyed the source of the music, she is writing off those also known as "men of science."1 Thus the paragraph introduces a topic central to the novel--science and its relationship to literature. Not insignificant, the letter addressed to Everell Fletcher also includes Hope's narration of her tutor Cradock's snakebite and Cradock's healing by a native woman, Nelema; and it is immediately followed by another

Journal

LegacyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 18, 2003

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