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Royal Match: The Army-Navy Service Game, July 4, 1918

Royal Match: The Army-Navy Service Game, July 4, 1918 Royal Match The Army-Navy Service Game, July 4, 1918 jim leeke The scene in the London stadium was as improbable as polo in Brooklyn: the King of England and thousands of loyal subjects, cheering American soldiers and sailors batting the horsehide around a diamond wedged onto a soccer field. Largely forgotten today, the great Fourth of July baseball match of 1918 was the most significant athletic event of the First World War. Baseball had gained a foothold in England that year thanks to the AngloAmerican Baseball League (AABL). The original plan of thirty American businessmen in England was for a six-team circuit of civilian professionals playing in Great Britain and in army camps in France. Promoters even began recruiting players in the United States. When this scheme proved impractical, the AABL gradually morphed into an eight-team US-Canadian military league. Organizers hoped to continue as a major league following the war. The AABL played primarily at sites in and near London, including the Arsenal football (soccer) ground at Highbury and the Chelsea football ground at Stamford Bridge, with a few games slated elsewhere in England and Scotland. Teams played on Saturdays and holidays from May 18 to August 24, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture uni_neb

Royal Match: The Army-Navy Service Game, July 4, 1918

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1844
Publisher site
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Abstract

Royal Match The Army-Navy Service Game, July 4, 1918 jim leeke The scene in the London stadium was as improbable as polo in Brooklyn: the King of England and thousands of loyal subjects, cheering American soldiers and sailors batting the horsehide around a diamond wedged onto a soccer field. Largely forgotten today, the great Fourth of July baseball match of 1918 was the most significant athletic event of the First World War. Baseball had gained a foothold in England that year thanks to the AngloAmerican Baseball League (AABL). The original plan of thirty American businessmen in England was for a six-team circuit of civilian professionals playing in Great Britain and in army camps in France. Promoters even began recruiting players in the United States. When this scheme proved impractical, the AABL gradually morphed into an eight-team US-Canadian military league. Organizers hoped to continue as a major league following the war. The AABL played primarily at sites in and near London, including the Arsenal football (soccer) ground at Highbury and the Chelsea football ground at Stamford Bridge, with a few games slated elsewhere in England and Scotland. Teams played on Saturdays and holidays from May 18 to August 24,

Journal

NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Cultureuni_neb

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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