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Rococo Fiction in France, 1600–1715: Seditious Frivolity by Allison Stedman (review)

Rococo Fiction in France, 1600–1715: Seditious Frivolity by Allison Stedman (review) 166 Fr ench Forum Winter 2014 Vol. 39, No. 1 also a long and important friendship comes to its dramatic climax. One follows closely Benjamin’s careful construction of “Das Paris des Second Empire bei Baudelaire” for over more than 800 pages, yet Adorno’s fero- cious criticism still comes as a shock. Aft er Adorno accused Benjamin of oscillating between magic and positivism, Benjamin replied by explaining to Adorno the necessity of his philological method: “On est philologue ou on ne l’est pas” (840). What happened to Benjamin aft er that is well- known. During the 1980s, the young philosopher Giorgio Agamben heard the call that sounded through these words. Ever since such early essays as Infancy & History and Stanzas, and up to his most recent publications, his work has been marked by a decisive Benjaminian infl uence. Whether it con- cerns the state of exception or, perhaps more importantly, the inquiry into the experience of language, it is the work of Benjamin that resonates with it. But, and this is what is made clear by the publication of this volume, Baudelaire’s voice can be heard as well . The publication of Baudelaire surely invites its readers to a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

Rococo Fiction in France, 1600–1715: Seditious Frivolity by Allison Stedman (review)

French Forum , Volume 39 (1) – Jul 30, 2014

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836

Abstract

166 Fr ench Forum Winter 2014 Vol. 39, No. 1 also a long and important friendship comes to its dramatic climax. One follows closely Benjamin’s careful construction of “Das Paris des Second Empire bei Baudelaire” for over more than 800 pages, yet Adorno’s fero- cious criticism still comes as a shock. Aft er Adorno accused Benjamin of oscillating between magic and positivism, Benjamin replied by explaining to Adorno the necessity of his philological method: “On est philologue ou on ne l’est pas” (840). What happened to Benjamin aft er that is well- known. During the 1980s, the young philosopher Giorgio Agamben heard the call that sounded through these words. Ever since such early essays as Infancy & History and Stanzas, and up to his most recent publications, his work has been marked by a decisive Benjaminian infl uence. Whether it con- cerns the state of exception or, perhaps more importantly, the inquiry into the experience of language, it is the work of Benjamin that resonates with it. But, and this is what is made clear by the publication of this volume, Baudelaire’s voice can be heard as well . The publication of Baudelaire surely invites its readers to a

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jul 30, 2014

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