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Rich Rhyme: Acoustic Allusions in Ronsard's Amours

Rich Rhyme: Acoustic Allusions in Ronsard's Amours Eric MacPhail Allusion is a form of wordplay that literary criticism has begun to take seriously especially in reference to Pléiade poetry. The activity inscribed in the verb alludo enables poets to perpetuate lyric tradition while experimenting with words, sounds, and ideas in new configurations. Allusion need not be a silent gesture, for poetry can signal acoustic as well as rhetorical or thematic affinities for prior texts through rhyme, assonance, alliteration, and other verbal echoes. This paper will try to detect the role of echo and allusion in Ronsard's Amours of 1552­53 as they exploit the sounds of lyric subjectivity from Ovid to Petrarch and beyond. Allusion occupies a somewhat unstable place in the range of intertextual practices defined by literary scholarship. In his study of Renaissance imitation, The Light in Troy, Thomas Greene draws a distinction, which he himself acknowledges to be a slippery one, between "allusions, usages of earlier texts that the reader must recognize in order to read competently," and "repetitions, whose provenience may be obscure or irrelevant and matters little for the reading of the poem."1 For instance Joachim Du Bellay's Antiquitez de Rome allude to Virgil's Aeneid while the Olive repeats some of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

Rich Rhyme: Acoustic Allusions in Ronsard's Amours

French Forum , Volume 27 (2) – Feb 13, 2002

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836
Publisher site
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Abstract

Eric MacPhail Allusion is a form of wordplay that literary criticism has begun to take seriously especially in reference to Pléiade poetry. The activity inscribed in the verb alludo enables poets to perpetuate lyric tradition while experimenting with words, sounds, and ideas in new configurations. Allusion need not be a silent gesture, for poetry can signal acoustic as well as rhetorical or thematic affinities for prior texts through rhyme, assonance, alliteration, and other verbal echoes. This paper will try to detect the role of echo and allusion in Ronsard's Amours of 1552­53 as they exploit the sounds of lyric subjectivity from Ovid to Petrarch and beyond. Allusion occupies a somewhat unstable place in the range of intertextual practices defined by literary scholarship. In his study of Renaissance imitation, The Light in Troy, Thomas Greene draws a distinction, which he himself acknowledges to be a slippery one, between "allusions, usages of earlier texts that the reader must recognize in order to read competently," and "repetitions, whose provenience may be obscure or irrelevant and matters little for the reading of the poem."1 For instance Joachim Du Bellay's Antiquitez de Rome allude to Virgil's Aeneid while the Olive repeats some of

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 13, 2002

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