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Rhetorical Removals

Rhetorical Removals review essay daniel heath justice In the Great American Indian novel, when it is finally written, all of the white people will be Indians and all of the Indians will be ghosts. Sherman Alexie (Spokane/Coeur d'Alene) "How to Write the Great American Indian Novel" The stubborn insistence by North American Indigenous peoples on surviving the ravages of colonization has been an issue of constant fascination and frequent frustration to Eurowesterners since the onset of Invasion. The long-promised vanishing never took place, in spite of centuries of slaughter, dispossession, and marginalization; lynch mobs, politicians, and well-heeled social reformers alike have failed to make Indians a memory, though not for lack of trying. The endurance of Indian nations is more than just an accident of history or circumstance--it's a meaningful and daily assertion of physical, cultural, and political continuity. It's perhaps easy to understand why reactionaries--from extremist conservatives to profiteering capitalists to racist wingnuts--dislike Indians, considering that treaties, federal Indian policies, and the vigorous exercise of tribal sovereignty make the economic exploitation of tribal lands rather difficult (though, as the recent BIA trust fund scandals have demonstrated, by no means impossible). Yet it's always a bit puzzling why so many http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the individual contributors.
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
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Abstract

review essay daniel heath justice In the Great American Indian novel, when it is finally written, all of the white people will be Indians and all of the Indians will be ghosts. Sherman Alexie (Spokane/Coeur d'Alene) "How to Write the Great American Indian Novel" The stubborn insistence by North American Indigenous peoples on surviving the ravages of colonization has been an issue of constant fascination and frequent frustration to Eurowesterners since the onset of Invasion. The long-promised vanishing never took place, in spite of centuries of slaughter, dispossession, and marginalization; lynch mobs, politicians, and well-heeled social reformers alike have failed to make Indians a memory, though not for lack of trying. The endurance of Indian nations is more than just an accident of history or circumstance--it's a meaningful and daily assertion of physical, cultural, and political continuity. It's perhaps easy to understand why reactionaries--from extremist conservatives to profiteering capitalists to racist wingnuts--dislike Indians, considering that treaties, federal Indian policies, and the vigorous exercise of tribal sovereignty make the economic exploitation of tribal lands rather difficult (though, as the recent BIA trust fund scandals have demonstrated, by no means impossible). Yet it's always a bit puzzling why so many

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 14, 2005

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