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Rethinking the Intimacy of Voice and Ear: Psychoanalysis and Genital Massage as Treatments for Hysteria

Rethinking the Intimacy of Voice and Ear: Psychoanalysis and Genital Massage as Treatments for... Rethinking the Intimacy of Voice and Ear Psychoanalysis and Genital Massage as Treatments for Hysteria Clara Hunter Latham sychoanalysis developed as a treatment for hysteria, that mysterious illness ubiquitously associated with femininity.1 In the last decades of the nineteenth century, Sigmund Freud and his colleague Josef Breuer began treating hysteria through talk, replacing former methods that involved somatic manipulation of the female body, often the reproductive organs themselves. In this article, I will consider the changing role of touch in the treatment of hysteria, specifically from the practice of genital massage to the so-called talking cure, developed by Breuer and his patient Bertha Pappenheim, aka "Anna O." My analysis of the changes in the site of treatment for hysteria, from bodies to voices, supports an argument that the sonic exchange of voices that constituted the talking cure functioned as a form of touch for the doctors and patients who practiced this therapy. The theory and practice of psychoanalysis lie at the core of a familiar story about the intimate relationship between voice and ear that has become prized in the twentieth century. Psychoanalytic theory is often considered to depend on a separation between a material voice that is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture uni_neb

Rethinking the Intimacy of Voice and Ear: Psychoanalysis and Genital Massage as Treatments for Hysteria

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the International Alliance for Women in Music.
ISSN
1553-0612
Publisher site
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Abstract

Rethinking the Intimacy of Voice and Ear Psychoanalysis and Genital Massage as Treatments for Hysteria Clara Hunter Latham sychoanalysis developed as a treatment for hysteria, that mysterious illness ubiquitously associated with femininity.1 In the last decades of the nineteenth century, Sigmund Freud and his colleague Josef Breuer began treating hysteria through talk, replacing former methods that involved somatic manipulation of the female body, often the reproductive organs themselves. In this article, I will consider the changing role of touch in the treatment of hysteria, specifically from the practice of genital massage to the so-called talking cure, developed by Breuer and his patient Bertha Pappenheim, aka "Anna O." My analysis of the changes in the site of treatment for hysteria, from bodies to voices, supports an argument that the sonic exchange of voices that constituted the talking cure functioned as a form of touch for the doctors and patients who practiced this therapy. The theory and practice of psychoanalysis lie at the core of a familiar story about the intimate relationship between voice and ear that has become prized in the twentieth century. Psychoanalytic theory is often considered to depend on a separation between a material voice that is

Journal

Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Cultureuni_neb

Published: Sep 10, 2015

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