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Remembering the "Forgotten Child": The American Indian Child Welfare Crisis of the 1960s and 1970s

Remembering the "Forgotten Child": The American Indian Child Welfare Crisis of the 1960s and 1970s Remembering the "Forgotten Child" The American Indian Child Welfare Crisis of the 1960s and 1970s margaret d. jacobs On Christmas Day 1975, Marcia Marie Summers was born to Charlene Summers, a member and resident of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation in North Dakota. A few months later, a white couple from Indiana approached the young mother and offered to care for her infant while Summers attended school. (Just two months before, the couple had filed an adoption petition in the Standing Rock Tribal Court for another Indian child, but the court had denied their request.) Assuming she was making a temporary arrangement, Summers agreed and signed a document giving the Indiana couple power of attorney over Marcia Marie in parent-child-related actions. Immediately, the couple departed with the baby from the reservation and returned to Indiana. Summers realized that the couple intended to permanently adopt her daughter, so she asked the Standing Rock Tribal Court to intervene. When the couple ignored the tribal court's order to return the child to her mother, Summers and tribal authorities requested the help of the Association on American Indian Affairs (aaia). Their attorney filed a writ of habeas corpus on Summers's behalf in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Remembering the "Forgotten Child": The American Indian Child Welfare Crisis of the 1960s and 1970s

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 37 (1) – Jun 2, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

Remembering the "Forgotten Child" The American Indian Child Welfare Crisis of the 1960s and 1970s margaret d. jacobs On Christmas Day 1975, Marcia Marie Summers was born to Charlene Summers, a member and resident of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation in North Dakota. A few months later, a white couple from Indiana approached the young mother and offered to care for her infant while Summers attended school. (Just two months before, the couple had filed an adoption petition in the Standing Rock Tribal Court for another Indian child, but the court had denied their request.) Assuming she was making a temporary arrangement, Summers agreed and signed a document giving the Indiana couple power of attorney over Marcia Marie in parent-child-related actions. Immediately, the couple departed with the baby from the reservation and returned to Indiana. Summers realized that the couple intended to permanently adopt her daughter, so she asked the Standing Rock Tribal Court to intervene. When the couple ignored the tribal court's order to return the child to her mother, Summers and tribal authorities requested the help of the Association on American Indian Affairs (aaia). Their attorney filed a writ of habeas corpus on Summers's behalf in

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 2, 2013

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