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Reconstructing Science and Technology Studies: Views from Feminist Standpoint Theory

Reconstructing Science and Technology Studies: Views from Feminist Standpoint Theory Reconstructing Science and Technology Studies Views from Feminist Standpoint Theory nancy d. campbell Like feminist studies, science and technology studies (STS) emerged from the crucible of social protest. Both arose from the democratic social movements of the 1960s. Proponents of the field that consolidated as interdisciplinary STS took science and technology as objects of political critique from the anthropological, historical, philosophical, and sociological perspectives out of which STS emerged. The analysis of scientific practices, technologies, and the sociotechnical outcomes and effects of science and technology became the basis of knowledge practices in the field.1 The legacy of this activist history is not unlike the construction of women's and gender studies as the "academic arm" of the women's movement. STS and feminist thought converge at several points, particularly in the project to grapple with social inequality and the desire to contribute scholarly support to movements for social and environmental justice. Shared goals include enabling more egalitarian practices in technoscientific fields themselves; redistributing social goods; pointing out the wrongs that result from not doing so; and rendering research and development (R&D) enterprises more dependable allies in struggles for social justice. Despite overlaps, however, STS and feminist studies inhabit different conceptual http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Reconstructing Science and Technology Studies: Views from Feminist Standpoint Theory

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1536-0334
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Abstract

Reconstructing Science and Technology Studies Views from Feminist Standpoint Theory nancy d. campbell Like feminist studies, science and technology studies (STS) emerged from the crucible of social protest. Both arose from the democratic social movements of the 1960s. Proponents of the field that consolidated as interdisciplinary STS took science and technology as objects of political critique from the anthropological, historical, philosophical, and sociological perspectives out of which STS emerged. The analysis of scientific practices, technologies, and the sociotechnical outcomes and effects of science and technology became the basis of knowledge practices in the field.1 The legacy of this activist history is not unlike the construction of women's and gender studies as the "academic arm" of the women's movement. STS and feminist thought converge at several points, particularly in the project to grapple with social inequality and the desire to contribute scholarly support to movements for social and environmental justice. Shared goals include enabling more egalitarian practices in technoscientific fields themselves; redistributing social goods; pointing out the wrongs that result from not doing so; and rendering research and development (R&D) enterprises more dependable allies in struggles for social justice. Despite overlaps, however, STS and feminist studies inhabit different conceptual

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 30, 2009

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