Re-marking the Ultratranscendental in Moby-Dick

Re-marking the Ultratranscendental in Moby-Dick TIM DEINES Can one fall out of or transcend relation? If we no longer accept that transcendence transcends, that there is no ideality in general which is not infinitely entangled, at some point, in the question of ontic being, we still do not know, and will never know, strictly speaking, what this therefore means for thinking futurity, or the Other, or the aftermath of decision. And while this opening of ideality (which would include ontology) makes historiography, for example, possible and even necessary, it also conditions historiography as infinitely open to what would confront it as its own historicity. Such a situation, of course, provokes literally endless problems for literary criticism, and especially for those specialties that, for whatever reasons, feel obliged to close this historiographical opening, sometimes in the name and justification of a institutionalized periodization, an archive, sometimes in the name of a political program or a historicism, in the name of State and nation. This paper takes the position that such closures are necessary, in a certain way, even as we must continue to understand how we are to remark upon such necessity. For one of the great lessons of deconstruction has always been that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Re-marking the Ultratranscendental in Moby-Dick

symploke, Volume 18 (1) – May 18, 2011

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-0627
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Abstract

TIM DEINES Can one fall out of or transcend relation? If we no longer accept that transcendence transcends, that there is no ideality in general which is not infinitely entangled, at some point, in the question of ontic being, we still do not know, and will never know, strictly speaking, what this therefore means for thinking futurity, or the Other, or the aftermath of decision. And while this opening of ideality (which would include ontology) makes historiography, for example, possible and even necessary, it also conditions historiography as infinitely open to what would confront it as its own historicity. Such a situation, of course, provokes literally endless problems for literary criticism, and especially for those specialties that, for whatever reasons, feel obliged to close this historiographical opening, sometimes in the name and justification of a institutionalized periodization, an archive, sometimes in the name of a political program or a historicism, in the name of State and nation. This paper takes the position that such closures are necessary, in a certain way, even as we must continue to understand how we are to remark upon such necessity. For one of the great lessons of deconstruction has always been that

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symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 18, 2011

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