Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Public Subjects: Race and the Critical Reception of Gwendolyn Brooks, Erica Hunt, and Harryette Mullen

Public Subjects: Race and the Critical Reception of Gwendolyn Brooks, Erica Hunt, and Harryette... 02-N3494 7/12/05 6:26 AM Page 3 Public Subjects Race and the Critical Reception of Gwendolyn Brooks, Erica Hunt, and Harryette Mullen allison cummings Since the 1970s, many critics of contemporary American poetry have focused on the issue of subjectivity, particularly the “I” or speaker in poetry and its po- litical implications. Far fewer studies have focused on the subjectivities of ac- tual audiences for recent poetry, though reader-response critics and reception theorists have extensively discussed how individual readers interpret novels old and new. Because most reader-response theorists focus on novels and narrative, the shifting conventions within different poetry communities do not often figure into their examination of individual reader’s interpretive practices. Though this essay will describe both the real and imagined readers of these poetries, it is most concerned with delineating how different his- torical and critical moments, specifically the Black Arts movement and post- structuralism, shape poets’ notions of their audiences and determine how that work is received and understood. This essay joins other recent scholarship that assembles an alternative tradition of African American avant-garde poetry — in contrast to long-prevailing notions of accessible, plain-spoken black poetry — and it contributes to that scholarship a focus on poetry http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Public Subjects: Race and the Critical Reception of Gwendolyn Brooks, Erica Hunt, and Harryette Mullen

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/public-subjects-race-and-the-critical-reception-of-gwendolyn-brooks-fAGc8obC5W
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

02-N3494 7/12/05 6:26 AM Page 3 Public Subjects Race and the Critical Reception of Gwendolyn Brooks, Erica Hunt, and Harryette Mullen allison cummings Since the 1970s, many critics of contemporary American poetry have focused on the issue of subjectivity, particularly the “I” or speaker in poetry and its po- litical implications. Far fewer studies have focused on the subjectivities of ac- tual audiences for recent poetry, though reader-response critics and reception theorists have extensively discussed how individual readers interpret novels old and new. Because most reader-response theorists focus on novels and narrative, the shifting conventions within different poetry communities do not often figure into their examination of individual reader’s interpretive practices. Though this essay will describe both the real and imagined readers of these poetries, it is most concerned with delineating how different his- torical and critical moments, specifically the Black Arts movement and post- structuralism, shape poets’ notions of their audiences and determine how that work is received and understood. This essay joins other recent scholarship that assembles an alternative tradition of African American avant-garde poetry — in contrast to long-prevailing notions of accessible, plain-spoken black poetry — and it contributes to that scholarship a focus on poetry

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 23, 2005

There are no references for this article.