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Preface

Preface We have a bumper crop of good articles this year, pushing the one-pound mailing limit beyond which we dare not go (costs are alleged to double). The volume opens with a cluster of articles that have a common affinity for perspectives of transnational feminism. The germ for this section was a particularly compelling panel at the 2004 Women in German conference (thanks to organizers Jennifer Hosek and Elizabeth Mittman!), but happenstance brought us several more related manuscripts. Two of these are interviews with writers who negotiate competing currents of cultures and languages in their work and their lives: Bettina Brandt's interview of Yoko Tawada--who writes in both Japanese and German, and who takes issue "with the presumption of a stable, nation-based, language-rooted identity" (Brandt 6)--and Helga Kraft's interview of Sabine Scholl--an expatriate Austrian who has lived and worked in Portugal, Japan, the United States, and Germany, and whose works "articulate her discoveries in transnational interconnectedness" (Kraft 86). Emily Jeremiah also focuses on a border-troubling contemporary writer, the Finnish-based German poet Dorothea Grünzweig, whose poems "enact and celebrate nomadism" (Jeremiah 241). Deborah Janson explores Afro-German identity formation through an examination of Ika Hügel-Marshall's autobiography Daheim unterwegs: Ein deutsches Leben. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature & Culture uni_neb

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 the Board of Regents.
ISSN
1940-512X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We have a bumper crop of good articles this year, pushing the one-pound mailing limit beyond which we dare not go (costs are alleged to double). The volume opens with a cluster of articles that have a common affinity for perspectives of transnational feminism. The germ for this section was a particularly compelling panel at the 2004 Women in German conference (thanks to organizers Jennifer Hosek and Elizabeth Mittman!), but happenstance brought us several more related manuscripts. Two of these are interviews with writers who negotiate competing currents of cultures and languages in their work and their lives: Bettina Brandt's interview of Yoko Tawada--who writes in both Japanese and German, and who takes issue "with the presumption of a stable, nation-based, language-rooted identity" (Brandt 6)--and Helga Kraft's interview of Sabine Scholl--an expatriate Austrian who has lived and worked in Portugal, Japan, the United States, and Germany, and whose works "articulate her discoveries in transnational interconnectedness" (Kraft 86). Emily Jeremiah also focuses on a border-troubling contemporary writer, the Finnish-based German poet Dorothea Grünzweig, whose poems "enact and celebrate nomadism" (Jeremiah 241). Deborah Janson explores Afro-German identity formation through an examination of Ika Hügel-Marshall's autobiography Daheim unterwegs: Ein deutsches Leben.

Journal

Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature & Cultureuni_neb

Published: Oct 13, 2005

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