Precontact Sources in Historical Narratives

Precontact Sources in Historical Narratives Alejandra Dubcovsky "I have to see this rock," I decided. After reading Terry F. Norris and Timothy R. Pauketat's article touting their discovery of a pre-Columbian map of the Mississippi, I was determined to look, touch, and get as close as possible to this Indian-made map. Norris and Pauketat's 2008 article in Southeastern Archaeology described a large, carefully engraved rock map. The Commerce Map could be found on the banks of the Mississippi River, about 150 miles south of St. Louis, Missouri. There are so few native maps of the South (or, for that matter, of the precolonial world in general), that the possibility of a new one was more than a little exciting. I have no formal training in anthropology. My PhD work is firmly rooted in history. My dissertation research was on communication networks and information spread in the colonial Southeast; my work had pushed me to consider scholarship outside of the traditional national America narrative, but my quick dabbles into Caribbean and Latin American literatures had hardly challenged my disciplinary background. Like many academics I had enthusiastically praised the virtue of interdisciplinary work, but I had never personally attempted to bridge the gaps between disciplines. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native South University of Nebraska Press

Precontact Sources in Historical Narratives

Native South, Volume 7 (1) – Jul 16, 2014

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4025
Publisher site
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Abstract

Alejandra Dubcovsky "I have to see this rock," I decided. After reading Terry F. Norris and Timothy R. Pauketat's article touting their discovery of a pre-Columbian map of the Mississippi, I was determined to look, touch, and get as close as possible to this Indian-made map. Norris and Pauketat's 2008 article in Southeastern Archaeology described a large, carefully engraved rock map. The Commerce Map could be found on the banks of the Mississippi River, about 150 miles south of St. Louis, Missouri. There are so few native maps of the South (or, for that matter, of the precolonial world in general), that the possibility of a new one was more than a little exciting. I have no formal training in anthropology. My PhD work is firmly rooted in history. My dissertation research was on communication networks and information spread in the colonial Southeast; my work had pushed me to consider scholarship outside of the traditional national America narrative, but my quick dabbles into Caribbean and Latin American literatures had hardly challenged my disciplinary background. Like many academics I had enthusiastically praised the virtue of interdisciplinary work, but I had never personally attempted to bridge the gaps between disciplines.

Journal

Native SouthUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jul 16, 2014

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