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Pouring Out the Blues: Gwen "Sugar Mama" Avery's Song of Freedom

Pouring Out the Blues: Gwen "Sugar Mama" Avery's Song of Freedom Pouring Out the Blues Gwen "Sugar Mama" Avery's Song of Freedom maria v. johnson I can remember . . . [seeing] Gwen perform--just herself at the piano with a microphone. She would just pour out The Blues. . . . I can remember feeling the hair on the back of my neck stand on end, because it was the real thing. Linda Tillery If I could write a-one song to sing to you It would be a song of freedom for you and me. Gwen Avery, "Sad Song" While preparing the introduction to my third submission of this article for publication, I was reading through Evelynn Hammonds's essay, "Black (W)holes and the Geometry of Black Female Sexuality," and I was struck by her illustrations of how black female sexuality is still so thoroughly invisible, unimagined, and unimaginable. I thought about how this article had been deemed inappropriate for a gay/lesbian issue of one journal because it "fell between two thematic stools--the `ethnic' and the `gay/lesbian'" and rejected by a second journal because its interest was thought to be too narrow. Black women in general have tended to disappear into the cracks, effectively erased by the "either/or" thinking so http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Pouring Out the Blues: Gwen "Sugar Mama" Avery's Song of Freedom

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 25 (1) – May 20, 2004

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pouring Out the Blues Gwen "Sugar Mama" Avery's Song of Freedom maria v. johnson I can remember . . . [seeing] Gwen perform--just herself at the piano with a microphone. She would just pour out The Blues. . . . I can remember feeling the hair on the back of my neck stand on end, because it was the real thing. Linda Tillery If I could write a-one song to sing to you It would be a song of freedom for you and me. Gwen Avery, "Sad Song" While preparing the introduction to my third submission of this article for publication, I was reading through Evelynn Hammonds's essay, "Black (W)holes and the Geometry of Black Female Sexuality," and I was struck by her illustrations of how black female sexuality is still so thoroughly invisible, unimagined, and unimaginable. I thought about how this article had been deemed inappropriate for a gay/lesbian issue of one journal because it "fell between two thematic stools--the `ethnic' and the `gay/lesbian'" and rejected by a second journal because its interest was thought to be too narrow. Black women in general have tended to disappear into the cracks, effectively erased by the "either/or" thinking so

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 20, 2004

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