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Posthumanism in the Age of Globalization: Rethinking the End of Education

Posthumanism in the Age of Globalization: Rethinking the End of Education WILLIAM V. SPANOS To return to play its purely profane vocation is a political task. --Giorgio Agamben (2007, 77) I am grateful to the editors of this volume on the urgent question of humanism and the humanities in higher education for inviting me to reconsider what I wrote about this urgent issue nearly twenty years ago--in the aftermath of the Vietnam War--in my book, The End of Education: Toward Posthumanism (1993), from the vantage point of the post-9/11 occasion, an expanse of volatile time that bore witness to the implosion of the Soviet Union and the United States' renewed initiative (following its "kicking" of the "Vietnam syndrome" at the time of the first Gulf War), to achieve global hegemony. I mean the imperial initiative, precipitated, above all, by the al Qaeda bombing of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, that, in providing the U.S. with a "new frontier" (enemy)1 "justified" the George W. Bush administration's declaration of an unending global "War on Terror," which is to say, not only to undertake, in the name of "the clash of civilizations," 1 I am referring to "the American jeremiad," that national ritual inaugurated by the founding Puritans, that, by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Posthumanism in the Age of Globalization: Rethinking the End of Education

symploke , Volume 23 (1) – Dec 31, 2015

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University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © 2008 symploke.
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1534-0627
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Abstract

WILLIAM V. SPANOS To return to play its purely profane vocation is a political task. --Giorgio Agamben (2007, 77) I am grateful to the editors of this volume on the urgent question of humanism and the humanities in higher education for inviting me to reconsider what I wrote about this urgent issue nearly twenty years ago--in the aftermath of the Vietnam War--in my book, The End of Education: Toward Posthumanism (1993), from the vantage point of the post-9/11 occasion, an expanse of volatile time that bore witness to the implosion of the Soviet Union and the United States' renewed initiative (following its "kicking" of the "Vietnam syndrome" at the time of the first Gulf War), to achieve global hegemony. I mean the imperial initiative, precipitated, above all, by the al Qaeda bombing of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, that, in providing the U.S. with a "new frontier" (enemy)1 "justified" the George W. Bush administration's declaration of an unending global "War on Terror," which is to say, not only to undertake, in the name of "the clash of civilizations," 1 I am referring to "the American jeremiad," that national ritual inaugurated by the founding Puritans, that, by

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symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 31, 2015

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