Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Political Environments

Political Environments katherine f. chandler A review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010); and Isabelle Stengers, Cosmopolitics I, trans. Robert Bononno (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010). Cited in the text as VM and CI, respectively. Following relations between texts and environments, ecocriticism has typically examined how human cultures affect and are affected by the physical world, while at the same time pointing to the political stakes of these issues. In her introduction to The Ecocriticism Reader (1996), Cheryll Glotfelty observes that "most ecocritical work shares a common motivation: the troubling awareness that we have reached the age of environmental limits, a time when the consequences of human actions are damaging the planet's life support systems."1 By reflecting on key historical, aesthetic, and ethical concerns, ecocriticism provides crucial insights into the conceptualization of nature and the political implications of these views. Addressing ecological issues in this way, most ecocritical texts uphold a distinction between human action and cultural modes of perception, on the one hand, and the material environment, on the other. Even though ecocriticism pursues a dense web of connections that link texts and humans to natures, its political http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences University of Nebraska Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/political-environments-E407Cxx2q5
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1938-8020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

katherine f. chandler A review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010); and Isabelle Stengers, Cosmopolitics I, trans. Robert Bononno (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010). Cited in the text as VM and CI, respectively. Following relations between texts and environments, ecocriticism has typically examined how human cultures affect and are affected by the physical world, while at the same time pointing to the political stakes of these issues. In her introduction to The Ecocriticism Reader (1996), Cheryll Glotfelty observes that "most ecocritical work shares a common motivation: the troubling awareness that we have reached the age of environmental limits, a time when the consequences of human actions are damaging the planet's life support systems."1 By reflecting on key historical, aesthetic, and ethical concerns, ecocriticism provides crucial insights into the conceptualization of nature and the political implications of these views. Addressing ecological issues in this way, most ecocritical texts uphold a distinction between human action and cultural modes of perception, on the one hand, and the material environment, on the other. Even though ecocriticism pursues a dense web of connections that link texts and humans to natures, its political

Journal

Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social SciencesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 6, 2011

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month