Pan-Maya and “Trans-Indigenous”: The Living Voice of the Chilam Balam in Victor Montejo and Leslie Marmon Silko

Pan-Maya and “Trans-Indigenous”: The Living Voice of the Chilam Balam in Victor Montejo and... Pan-Maya and "Trans-Indigenous" The Living Voice of the Chilam Balam in Victor Montejo and Leslie Marmon Silko Paul Worley One of the foremost challenges that indigenous literatures present to nonindigenous readers and critics is, quite simply, the category of literature itself. Insofar as the Western literary histories and verbal aesthetic practices "literature" denotes are by no means universal, the application of the term "literature" all too frequently precludes an approach that recognizes non-Western and indigenous verbal arts as things-inthemselves in favor of analyses that correspond to preexisting notions of literariness and what constitutes literature. For example, while some scholars begrudgingly and in many cases problematically explore the relationships of indigenous oral traditions to indigenous written works, Chadwick Allen observes that scant attention has been paid to the complex interrelation between indigenous verbal arts and works in media such as wood, textiles, and painting (xxii). Along these lines, Muskogee Creek / Cherokee Craig S. Womack argues that even theoretical movements like postcolonialism have tended to overlook basic questions such as "How do Indians view Indians?" in favor of endlessly interrogating colonial constructions of indigenous peoples and non-Western others (13). That is, in their criticism many scholars tend to eschew http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Pan-Maya and “Trans-Indigenous”: The Living Voice of the Chilam Balam in Victor Montejo and Leslie Marmon Silko

Studies in American Indian Literatures, Volume 28 (1) – May 14, 2016

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © The individual contributors
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1548-9590
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Abstract

Pan-Maya and "Trans-Indigenous" The Living Voice of the Chilam Balam in Victor Montejo and Leslie Marmon Silko Paul Worley One of the foremost challenges that indigenous literatures present to nonindigenous readers and critics is, quite simply, the category of literature itself. Insofar as the Western literary histories and verbal aesthetic practices "literature" denotes are by no means universal, the application of the term "literature" all too frequently precludes an approach that recognizes non-Western and indigenous verbal arts as things-inthemselves in favor of analyses that correspond to preexisting notions of literariness and what constitutes literature. For example, while some scholars begrudgingly and in many cases problematically explore the relationships of indigenous oral traditions to indigenous written works, Chadwick Allen observes that scant attention has been paid to the complex interrelation between indigenous verbal arts and works in media such as wood, textiles, and painting (xxii). Along these lines, Muskogee Creek / Cherokee Craig S. Womack argues that even theoretical movements like postcolonialism have tended to overlook basic questions such as "How do Indians view Indians?" in favor of endlessly interrogating colonial constructions of indigenous peoples and non-Western others (13). That is, in their criticism many scholars tend to eschew

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 14, 2016

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