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Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Typology (review)

Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Typology (review) Book Reviews The Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Typology. JAE JUNG SONG, ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2011. Pp. xxi + 704. $150.00 (cloth). Reviewed by Jeffrey Heath, University of Michigan There are eleven other linguistic volumes in the Oxford Handbook series. This one contains thirty chapters, from ten to forty-five pages each. It is especially useful for readers who are not themselves engaged in mainstream typology but who wish to follow or catch up on it. For this journal, instead of a technical review aimed at typologists, or complete coverage of the chapters, a selective appreciation with a linguistic anthropological flavor is appropriate. If by mainstream typology we mean the inheritors of Joseph Greenberg's first-order worldwide codings of grammatical data points (e.g., constituent order, morphological agreement), and second-order correlations among them, the main recent news has been the intrusion of geography and history. This "epiphany" (as the editor calls it on p. 3) began around 1990 with work by, e.g., Matthew Dryer and Johanna Nichols. It had once seemed that worldwide typology would flourish as conclusions drawn from Greenberg's thirty languages were refined by the addition of hundreds of new languages; Chomsky's absolute universals would be supplemented or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropological Linguistics University of Nebraska Press

Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Typology (review)

Anthropological Linguistics , Volume 53 (3) – Jun 30, 2011

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6527
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Abstract

Book Reviews The Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Typology. JAE JUNG SONG, ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2011. Pp. xxi + 704. $150.00 (cloth). Reviewed by Jeffrey Heath, University of Michigan There are eleven other linguistic volumes in the Oxford Handbook series. This one contains thirty chapters, from ten to forty-five pages each. It is especially useful for readers who are not themselves engaged in mainstream typology but who wish to follow or catch up on it. For this journal, instead of a technical review aimed at typologists, or complete coverage of the chapters, a selective appreciation with a linguistic anthropological flavor is appropriate. If by mainstream typology we mean the inheritors of Joseph Greenberg's first-order worldwide codings of grammatical data points (e.g., constituent order, morphological agreement), and second-order correlations among them, the main recent news has been the intrusion of geography and history. This "epiphany" (as the editor calls it on p. 3) began around 1990 with work by, e.g., Matthew Dryer and Johanna Nichols. It had once seemed that worldwide typology would flourish as conclusions drawn from Greenberg's thirty languages were refined by the addition of hundreds of new languages; Chomsky's absolute universals would be supplemented or

Journal

Anthropological LinguisticsUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 30, 2011

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