Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Overgrown Sandlots: The Diminishment of Pickup Ball in the Midwest

Overgrown Sandlots: The Diminishment of Pickup Ball in the Midwest Overgrown Sandlots The Diminishment of Pickup Ball in the Midwest david c. ogden Somewhere between the late baby boomers and the X generation, baseball seemingly lost its status as the object of spontaneous play among adolescent males. "My friends and I would get games going all the time as kids, but kids today don't," observed a Midwestern youth league coach. At the same time, certain types of organized baseball have grown substantially during the 1990s.1 The characteristics and merits of both "informal" and "formal" baseball have been extensively debated.2 Some scholars have expressed concern about the erosion of pickup baseball from the cultural landscape and about the diminishment of baseball's role in the development of social skills. The extent of that erosion and its impact on "elite" youth players has been discussed little, if at all. A review of the sports sociology literature and interviews with youth baseball coaches and officials throughout the Midwest show that baseball is losing its status as a vehicle by which children and adolescents learn cooperation and negotiation and hone physical skills. background According to Coakley and others, pickup, or "informal," baseball is spontaneously organized by adolescents or children without instigation or coordination http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture University of Nebraska Press

Overgrown Sandlots: The Diminishment of Pickup Ball in the Midwest

Loading next page...
1
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/overgrown-sandlots-the-diminishment-of-pickup-ball-in-the-midwest-bwbyrHleDT
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1844
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Overgrown Sandlots The Diminishment of Pickup Ball in the Midwest david c. ogden Somewhere between the late baby boomers and the X generation, baseball seemingly lost its status as the object of spontaneous play among adolescent males. "My friends and I would get games going all the time as kids, but kids today don't," observed a Midwestern youth league coach. At the same time, certain types of organized baseball have grown substantially during the 1990s.1 The characteristics and merits of both "informal" and "formal" baseball have been extensively debated.2 Some scholars have expressed concern about the erosion of pickup baseball from the cultural landscape and about the diminishment of baseball's role in the development of social skills. The extent of that erosion and its impact on "elite" youth players has been discussed little, if at all. A review of the sports sociology literature and interviews with youth baseball coaches and officials throughout the Midwest show that baseball is losing its status as a vehicle by which children and adolescents learn cooperation and negotiation and hone physical skills. background According to Coakley and others, pickup, or "informal," baseball is spontaneously organized by adolescents or children without instigation or coordination

Journal

NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 3, 2002

There are no references for this article.