Our Wealth Sits on the Table: Food, Resistance, and Salmon Farming in Two First Nations Communities

Our Wealth Sits on the Table: Food, Resistance, and Salmon Farming in Two First Nations Communities Our Wealth Sits on the Table Food, Resistance, and Salmon Farming in Two First Nations Communities dorothee schreiber "It sits on the table, our wealth. . . . I mean, I can go into Safeway and I can go look at a small little sockeye for 20 bucks, where in reality, our tribe alone, we went out and got 12,000 [wild sockeye] distributed between our people," said Dan Cummings from the Ahousaht Fisheries Office.1 He was responding to my questions about the differences between farmed and wild salmon, salmon farmers and fishers, and net pens and fishing spots. I had come to Flores Island off the west coast of Vancouver Island to speak to Ahousaht people about how they experienced the effects of the local salmon farming industry. Commercial fishers, former fishers, and others from Ahousaht who regularly participate in marine resource harvesting have direct experience with the environmental changes brought about by salmon farming. In this article I look at some of the ways in which both commercial and "food" fishers who live on the reserves at Ahousaht (Ahousaht First Nation, in Nuu-chah-nulth territory) and Alert Bay (Namgis First Nation, Kwakwaka'wakw territory) make sense of the salmon http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Our Wealth Sits on the Table: Food, Resistance, and Salmon Farming in Two First Nations Communities

The American Indian Quarterly, Volume 26 (3) – Dec 23, 2002

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

Our Wealth Sits on the Table Food, Resistance, and Salmon Farming in Two First Nations Communities dorothee schreiber "It sits on the table, our wealth. . . . I mean, I can go into Safeway and I can go look at a small little sockeye for 20 bucks, where in reality, our tribe alone, we went out and got 12,000 [wild sockeye] distributed between our people," said Dan Cummings from the Ahousaht Fisheries Office.1 He was responding to my questions about the differences between farmed and wild salmon, salmon farmers and fishers, and net pens and fishing spots. I had come to Flores Island off the west coast of Vancouver Island to speak to Ahousaht people about how they experienced the effects of the local salmon farming industry. Commercial fishers, former fishers, and others from Ahousaht who regularly participate in marine resource harvesting have direct experience with the environmental changes brought about by salmon farming. In this article I look at some of the ways in which both commercial and "food" fishers who live on the reserves at Ahousaht (Ahousaht First Nation, in Nuu-chah-nulth territory) and Alert Bay (Namgis First Nation, Kwakwaka'wakw territory) make sense of the salmon

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 23, 2002

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