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On Zion's Mount: Mormons, Indians and the American Landscape (review)

On Zion's Mount: Mormons, Indians and the American Landscape (review) Finally, while there are certainly issues of diversity that Michaels addresses, and opportunity and access are part of that privilege he writes about, he seems to find it necessary to dismiss difference in favor of class. While class is important, it does not allow us to explore and address issues of ethnicity and identity based on culture, language, traditions, and worldview. As expected, while Asians, blacks, and Latinos dominate the discussion, Native Americans are incidental, such that when the topic queries reparations for loss of land, culture, and language, Michaels can only suggest that the price to repay would be too much. Thus, he negates any monetary figure based on the reality that such restitution would be too costly. And since the issue is Native Americans and their loss, it's always acceptable to neglect any resolution and let things continue as they are. After reading the book, the question remains: Why is any serious discussion of diversity here in the United States so quick to dismiss or ignore Native Americans as an integral part of that conversation? Perhaps because, as is evident with most of our tribal names when translated into English, we are people, but only in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

On Zion's Mount: Mormons, Indians and the American Landscape (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 33 (4) – Oct 28, 2009

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

Finally, while there are certainly issues of diversity that Michaels addresses, and opportunity and access are part of that privilege he writes about, he seems to find it necessary to dismiss difference in favor of class. While class is important, it does not allow us to explore and address issues of ethnicity and identity based on culture, language, traditions, and worldview. As expected, while Asians, blacks, and Latinos dominate the discussion, Native Americans are incidental, such that when the topic queries reparations for loss of land, culture, and language, Michaels can only suggest that the price to repay would be too much. Thus, he negates any monetary figure based on the reality that such restitution would be too costly. And since the issue is Native Americans and their loss, it's always acceptable to neglect any resolution and let things continue as they are. After reading the book, the question remains: Why is any serious discussion of diversity here in the United States so quick to dismiss or ignore Native Americans as an integral part of that conversation? Perhaps because, as is evident with most of our tribal names when translated into English, we are people, but only in

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 28, 2009

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