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On Earning My Emergency Preparedness Merit Badge, and: Combo, Per the Norm, and: Hircine

On Earning My Emergency Preparedness Merit Badge, and: Combo, Per the Norm, and: Hircine Barbara Duffey On Earning My Emergency Preparedness Merit Badge I started well. I asked, ``Are you ok?'' I listened at its mouth for breath--there was none. I tilted back its head to clear its airways. I took its pulse; again, nothing. I held closed its nose and breathed twice in its mouth. I crouched above its chest and marked my place on its spring-loaded sternum with three fingers, two of which I took away so I could cradle the heel of my hand where my last finger had been. I pressed down. I counted, ``and one and two and three and four,'' but I didn't finish in time. The volunteer fireman said to me, ``He'd be dead by now. So what do you think? Should I certify you?'' I knew if I did what I'd done as slowly as I'd done it, to someone who really was in trouble, I wouldn't save her. I knew that if she seemed to be in trouble, I wouldn't even get up and offer that I knew cpr. I knew that, were there others in the room, especially grown-ups, I would act like I didn't know what cpr was. But he gave http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

On Earning My Emergency Preparedness Merit Badge, and: Combo, Per the Norm, and: Hircine

Prairie Schooner , Volume 82 (1) – May 11, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Nebraska Press
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1542-426X
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Abstract

Barbara Duffey On Earning My Emergency Preparedness Merit Badge I started well. I asked, ``Are you ok?'' I listened at its mouth for breath--there was none. I tilted back its head to clear its airways. I took its pulse; again, nothing. I held closed its nose and breathed twice in its mouth. I crouched above its chest and marked my place on its spring-loaded sternum with three fingers, two of which I took away so I could cradle the heel of my hand where my last finger had been. I pressed down. I counted, ``and one and two and three and four,'' but I didn't finish in time. The volunteer fireman said to me, ``He'd be dead by now. So what do you think? Should I certify you?'' I knew if I did what I'd done as slowly as I'd done it, to someone who really was in trouble, I wouldn't save her. I knew that if she seemed to be in trouble, I wouldn't even get up and offer that I knew cpr. I knew that, were there others in the room, especially grown-ups, I would act like I didn't know what cpr was. But he gave

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 11, 2008

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