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Old Worlds, New Travels: Jack London’s People of the Abyss, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, and the Cultural Politics of Travel

Old Worlds, New Travels: Jack London’s People of the Abyss, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also... Old Worlds, New Travels Jack London's People of the Abyss, Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, and the Cultural Politics of Travel , University of Alaska Southeast Although we may not immediately think of Jack London and Ernest Hemingway as travel writers, like many well-to-do Americans of their respective eras, they were travelling much more than their parents' generation had, and their writing is indelibly marked by these experiences away from home. London's forays, especially north to Alaska and the Yukon, but also to ports of call in the Pacific, were undertaken at the height of the American imperial era, and his writing sometimes echoes the discourses of empire. A generation younger than London, Hemingway's famous expatriate cosmopolitanism is marked by what Ford Maddox Ford dubbed the "habit of flux," the quintessentially modernist mode whereby the artist seeks the shock of exile to see one's own culture more clearly.1 In this essay, I argue that by reading London and Hemingway together as travel writers, we can elucidate the rapidly shifting cultural politics of travel and tourism, as well as their respective impacts on the way Americans would come to think of travel in the twentieth century and beyond. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Naturalism University of Nebraska Press

Old Worlds, New Travels: Jack London’s People of the Abyss, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, and the Cultural Politics of Travel

Studies in American Naturalism , Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 2016

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University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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1944-6519
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Abstract

Old Worlds, New Travels Jack London's People of the Abyss, Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, and the Cultural Politics of Travel , University of Alaska Southeast Although we may not immediately think of Jack London and Ernest Hemingway as travel writers, like many well-to-do Americans of their respective eras, they were travelling much more than their parents' generation had, and their writing is indelibly marked by these experiences away from home. London's forays, especially north to Alaska and the Yukon, but also to ports of call in the Pacific, were undertaken at the height of the American imperial era, and his writing sometimes echoes the discourses of empire. A generation younger than London, Hemingway's famous expatriate cosmopolitanism is marked by what Ford Maddox Ford dubbed the "habit of flux," the quintessentially modernist mode whereby the artist seeks the shock of exile to see one's own culture more clearly.1 In this essay, I argue that by reading London and Hemingway together as travel writers, we can elucidate the rapidly shifting cultural politics of travel and tourism, as well as their respective impacts on the way Americans would come to think of travel in the twentieth century and beyond.

Journal

Studies in American NaturalismUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 1, 2016

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