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Native American Oral Traditions: Collaboration and Interpretation (review)

Native American Oral Traditions: Collaboration and Interpretation (review) SAIL . SPRING 2004 . VOL. 16, NO. 1 Larry Evers and Barre Toelken, eds. Native American Oral Traditions: Collaboration and Interpretation. Logan: Utah State University Press, 2001. 264 pp. Domino Renee Perez From the time of Columbus, cultural outsiders have sought to record and explain the lifeways of Native peoples. Some have done so to "inform" voyeuristic audiences of the "savage" and brutal ways of a heathen race, while others have done so to preserve a written record of a people destined to inevitably vanish from the earth. Of the outsiders and cultural tourists presently reporting on American Indian cultures, none has become more reviled or looked upon with greater suspicion than the anthropologist, whose presence has spawned an entire genre of Indian jokes, like the one about the anthropologist who spends a whole day recording stories told by an old Indian man named Coyote. When the anthropologist returns to his lab, he discovers his tapes are blank except for the occasional snicker of laughter. But the misrepresentation, romanticization, and, at times, theft of indigenous material from cultural communities is no laughing matter; this is why Native American Oral Traditions: Collaboration and Interpretation is worthy of our http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Native American Oral Traditions: Collaboration and Interpretation (review)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Domino Renee Perez
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
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Abstract

SAIL . SPRING 2004 . VOL. 16, NO. 1 Larry Evers and Barre Toelken, eds. Native American Oral Traditions: Collaboration and Interpretation. Logan: Utah State University Press, 2001. 264 pp. Domino Renee Perez From the time of Columbus, cultural outsiders have sought to record and explain the lifeways of Native peoples. Some have done so to "inform" voyeuristic audiences of the "savage" and brutal ways of a heathen race, while others have done so to preserve a written record of a people destined to inevitably vanish from the earth. Of the outsiders and cultural tourists presently reporting on American Indian cultures, none has become more reviled or looked upon with greater suspicion than the anthropologist, whose presence has spawned an entire genre of Indian jokes, like the one about the anthropologist who spends a whole day recording stories told by an old Indian man named Coyote. When the anthropologist returns to his lab, he discovers his tapes are blank except for the occasional snicker of laughter. But the misrepresentation, romanticization, and, at times, theft of indigenous material from cultural communities is no laughing matter; this is why Native American Oral Traditions: Collaboration and Interpretation is worthy of our

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 4, 2004

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